Events

Callide oxyfuel research project, Part 1: Removal of SOx, NOx and mercury gases during CO2 compression

Date: 
Thursday, 21 July 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Event type: 
Webinar
Organised by: 
Global CCS Institute

To highlight the research and achievements of Australian researchers, the Global CCS Institute with ANLEC R&D will hold a series of webinars throughout 2016. Each webinar will highlight a specific ANLEC R&D research project and the relevant report found on the Institute’s website. This was the second webinar of the series, which focused on experiments quantifying and optimising the removal of SOx, NOx and mercury gases using compressed gaseous slip streams from the CPU as part of the Callide Oxyfuel Project.

The Callide Oxyfuel Project in central Queensland, Australia, has demonstrated carbon capture using oxyfuel technology  on a retrofitted 30 MWe boiler.  The project comprised of 2 x 330 t/day air separation units, a 30 MWe oxy-fuel boiler and a 75 t/day CO2 capture plant. The plant was commissioned in 2012 and operated for three years achieving nominally 10,000 hours of industrial operation in oxy-combustion mode.

The project has been able to demonstrate CO2 capture rates from the Oxyfuel flue gas stream to the CO2 capture plant in excess of 85%, and producing a high quality CO2 product suitable for geological storage. In addition, other benefits observed from the oxy-firing and CO2 capture demonstration have included: (i) increased boiler combustion efficiency; (ii) greater than 50% reduction in stack NOx mass emission rates; and (iii) almost complete removal of all toxic gaseous emissions including SOx, NOx, particulates and trace elements from the flue gas stream in the CO2 capture plant (CPU).

This webinar provided a technical presentation of experiments quantifying and optimising the removal of SOx, NOx and mercury gases using compressed gaseous slip streams from the CPU, complemented by plant measurements by the University Of Newcastle, supported by Australian National Low Emission R&D.  This webinar was presented by Professor Terry Wall and Dr Rohan Stanger from The University of Newcastle, Australia.

A recording of the webinar and a browsable version of the slides used in the presentation are available as an insight.