Filter by

Date +
Topic +
Organisation +

[ Clear Filtering ]

Publications, Reports & Research

Resources

Publications, Reports & Research

Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

Filter by

[ Clear Filtering ]

The Global CCS Institute presents the first detailed report on CO2 pipeline design for Australia. This comprehensive investigation provides a critical review of current Australian and global pipeline design standards for CO2 transport. The report provides insight into the current Australian Standards for Pipeline Design, AS2885 and undertaking fit-for-purpose dispersion modeling for CO2 detailing a set of guidelines and best practice recommendations.

The report was prepared for Brown Coal Innovation by Sherpa Consulting and funded by the Australian National Low Emissions Coal Research and Development Ltd (ANLEC R&D) and the Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport, and Resources of the State of Victoria, administered through Brown Coal Innovation Australia Limited and is part of the series of reports focussing on CCS in Victoria.

Chris Consoli, Institute Senior Adviser for Storage, Asia-Pacific also provides an overview of the report in an Insight available on the Global CCS Institute website.

This report is republished with the permission of The CarbonNet Project. It was funded in part by a contribution by the Global CCS Institute, commissioned within the scope of The CarbonNet Project and in line with The Institute's mission to accelerate the development, demonstration and deployment of carbon capture and storage globally. The views expressed within the report are those of the authors and not necessarily of the Global CCS Institute.

Download

Development of an aqueous ammonia based PCC technology for Australian conditions: process modelling of combined SO2 and CO2 capture using aqueous ammonia
Development of an aqueous ammonia based PCC technology for Australian conditions: process modelling of combined SO2 and CO2 capture using aqueous ammonia

25th March 2015

Organisation(s): Australian National Low Emissions Coal Research & Development (ANLEC R&D), Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 capture, Use and storage (CCUS)

This research project focuses on the development of the advanced aqueous ammonia based post combustion capture (PCC) technology. Two years into the project a novel process was proposed integrating CO2 and SO2 removal, flue gas cooling and ammonia recycle. Under the typical flue gas conditions, the proposed process has a SO2 removal efficiency of over 99.9% and ammonia reuse efficiency of 99.9%, which was confirmed by the experimental results. A rate based model was also developed for the aqueous ammonia based CO2 capture process and validated using the results from Munmorah Power Station pilot plant trials.

Download

The South West Hub Carbon Capture and Storage Project team, led by the Western Australian Department of Mines and Petroleum (DMP) is committed to an open process of community involvement during all stages of the project. The project team host regular community information sessions and make regular appearances at local agricultural shows. In October 2014 the project team released this report, ‘Lessons from Project Level Community Engagement’ that discusses the impacts and effects of the public engagement program undertaken by DMP.

This report is written by Peta Ashworth, Ash Research, for ANLEC R&D.

Download

Geochemical and geomechanical testing of near wellbore CO2 injectivity improvement
Geochemical and geomechanical testing of near wellbore CO2 injectivity improvement

1st October 2014

Organisation(s): Australian National Low Emissions Coal Research & Development (ANLEC R&D), The University of Queensland

Topic(s): CO2 storage

Geochemical and geomechanical testing of near wellbore CO2 injectivity improvement project encompassed three key parts, discussed in this report, aimed at supporting Australian CO2 geosequestration field demonstration and commercial projects.

Lab experiments were conducted on archived and fresh cores from the target formations of the Wandoan CCS project in the Surat Basin, Queensland and Berea Sandstone supplied by ANLEC R&D for the purpose of benchmarking of permeability results across related ANLEC R&D projects.

Geomechanical tests provided the basis for stress/permeability relationships.

Download

Novel gas-liquid contactor concepts for PCC capital and operating cost reduction
Novel gas-liquid contactor concepts for PCC capital and operating cost reduction

25th August 2014

Organisation(s): Australian National Low Emissions Coal Research & Development (ANLEC R&D), Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 capture, Economics, Use and storage (CCUS)

ANLEC R&D funded this CSIRO technical report that describes the development of a novel gas-liquid contactor aimed at reducing the capital and operating costs of Post Combustion Capture (PCC) commercial scale plants.

This project developed an innovative contactor which aimed to improve the economics of post combustion capture (PCC). The contactor design reduces the size of the column and eliminated the column packing, which enables an overall capital cost reduction of 30% and a power consumption reduction of 25%. Process optimisation in PCC deployment at scale will validate performance.  However the concept has demonstrated excellent potential for cost savings and can be applicable to many existing technologies and processes. 

Download

Harvey 2D test seismic survey – issues and optimisations: final report
Harvey 2D test seismic survey – issues and optimisations: final report

20th August 2014

Organisation(s): Australian National Low Emissions Coal Research & Development (ANLEC R&D), Curtin University

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 storage, Use and storage (CCUS)

This study validates the use of smaller sized vehicles to acquire signals in areas where access is not possible by conventional large vehicles in a 3D seismic survey. The study also demonstrated the best sweep characteristics to provide high resolution imaging of the shallow sections and delivered high resolution seismic images for the shallow sediments (<1000m) in the region of the Southwest Hub. The enhanced knowledge of the fault patterns at shallow depths also contributes to improved decision making for planning the next phase of reservoir characterisation activity at the site.

Download

Mercury and SO3 capture by the fabric filter in oxy-fuel technology
Mercury and SO3 capture by the fabric filter in oxy-fuel technology

1st August 2014

Organisation(s): Australia, Australian National Low Emissions Coal Research & Development (ANLEC R&D), University of Newcastle

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 capture, Use and storage (CCUS)

This project continues to study mercury removal from Oxy-fuel flue gas to reduce the associated costs and risks. It aims to quantify the extent of removal and the impact of impurities (SO3 and NOx) in the CO2. This report focuses on removing mercury with the presence of SO3 in the fabric filter. It concludes that, for practical carbon-in-ash levels, the competition between mercury and SO3 by ash can be neglected.

Download

Development of an aqueous ammonia based PCC technology for Australian conditions: technical report no. 3
Development of an aqueous ammonia based PCC technology for Australian conditions: technical report no. 3

11th July 2014

Organisation(s): Australia, Australian National Low Emissions Coal Research & Development (ANLEC R&D), Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), University of Newcastle

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 capture, Use and storage (CCUS)

Post combustion capture of CO2 in power generation using commercial amines results in a significant efficiency loss (25-30%). Using an aqueous ammonia solvent can reduce this loss because it has nearly double the carrying capacity and 40% lower re-generation energy among other benefits.  Realising this potential requires promoting the rate of absorption and optimising its performance by establishing fundamental kinetic relationships for the reactions. This report delivers the data for the use of piperazine and proline as promoters. Results to date are equivalent to - though have not yet exceeded the performance of benchmark MEA at the high COloadings required for PCC. This project remains in progress.

Download

Impacts of trace components on Oxy-combustion for the Callide Oxy-fuel Project: results from Callide fieldtrials, December, 2012
Impacts of trace components on Oxy-combustion for the Callide Oxy-fuel Project: results from Callide fieldtrials, December, 2012

11th July 2014

Organisation(s): Australian National Low Emissions Coal Research & Development (ANLEC R&D), Macquarie University

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 capture, Use and storage (CCUS)

Over a 3 week period in December 2012, the retrofitted Callide-A Oxyfuel demonstration power plant conducted an investigation into the behaviour of trace elements during oxy-firing and fluegas capture and processing.

This Macquarie University study is one of the first of its type at scale. Its conclusion suggests that the health and environmental outcomes under oxy-firing conditions are likely to be similar to those achieved when using conventional air-firing. Levels of metals, acid gases and mercury in particular, are below the level of operational concern in the CO2 processing unit after the first low pressure scrubber. The report contains a significant level of additional detail that will assist in both flowsheet design and environmental permitting for the technology.

 

Download

Impacts of trace components on Oxy-combustion for the Callide Oxy-fuel Project – Further results and analysis from Callide field trials, December, 2012
Impacts of trace components on Oxy-combustion for the Callide Oxy-fuel Project – Further results and analysis from Callide field trials, December, 2012

1st July 2014

Organisation(s): Australian National Low Emissions Coal Research & Development (ANLEC R&D), Macquarie University

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 capture, Health, safety and environment, Use and storage (CCUS)

ANLEC R&D funded this technical report that follows a previous report on field experiment results from the retrofitted Callide-A Oxyfuel demonstration power plant. Additional analysis was conducted to bring this project to a conclusion. Further results support that the levels of metals, acid gases and mercury in particular, are below the level of operational concern in the CO2 processing unit (CPU), and that the health and environmental outcomes under oxy-firing conditions are likely to be similar to those achieved when using conventional air-firing.

Download

Predicting CO2 injectivity properties for application at CCS sites: final report
Predicting CO2 injectivity properties for application at CCS sites: final report

1st July 2014

Organisation(s): Australian National Low Emissions Coal Research & Development (ANLEC R&D), Curtin University

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 storage, Use and storage (CCUS)

In any geological storage project it will be necessary to characterise the reservoir from core samples taken during exploratory drilling. This project uses four co-located specialist laboratories at the Australian Resources Research Centre (ARRC) Perth. It was able to demonstrate the development of a work-flow for unconventional detailed analysis of the reservoir characteristics that can inform decisions and reduce risk in the initiation of a carbon dioxide storage project.

Download

Improved discretisation and dynamic modelling of CO2 solubility during injection and subsequent convective dispersion
Improved discretisation and dynamic modelling of CO2 solubility during injection and subsequent convective dispersion

10th June 2014

Organisation(s): Australian National Low Emissions Coal Research & Development (ANLEC R&D), Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 storage, Use and storage (CCUS)

Based on the Precipice sandstone of the Surat Basin, this CSIRO study looks at some of the errors generated in the numerical simulation of CO2 migration and dissolution that are caused by the necessity of using large grid blocks in the simulation of field size projects. In the injection stage of a simulation, large grid blocks will cause an overestimation of the amount of CO2 that will dissolve in the formation brine.

The study addresses some of the shortcomings in the scientific literature regarding the effects of coarse grids on the convective mixing process and proposes a scheme for correcting the observed error in the convection enhanced dissolution by using grid corrected fluid or reservoir properties.

 

Download

Newsletter

Get the latest CCS updates