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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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The Global Status of CCS: 2014 Supplementary Information Presentation Package
The Global Status of CCS: 2014 Supplementary Information Presentation Package

5th November 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 capture, CO2 storage, CO2 transport, CO2 utilisation, Use and storage (CCUS)

The Supplementary Information presentation package includes chart materials not included in the Global Status of CCS: 2014 report. This material provides additional detail on the status of large-scale CCS projects globally. When used in conjunction with previous status reports, it provides researchers with access to the world’s most comprehensive historical data set on large-scale CCS projects.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Global CCS Institute annual review 2014
Global CCS Institute annual review 2014

31st October 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Use and storage (CCUS)

This Annual Review covers the Institute’s work achievements for July 2013 - June 2014. Showcasing global and regional achievements, it highlights the Institute’s work in progressing three key objectives:

  • authoritative knowledge sharing
  • fact-based, influential advice and advocacy, and
  • creation of favourable conditions to implement CCS.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Legal liability and carbon capture and storage: a comparative perspective
Legal liability and carbon capture and storage: a comparative perspective

1st October 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 storage, Law and regulation, Liability, Policy, Use and storage (CCUS)

Legal liability issues remain critically important for the commercial development of carbon capture and storage (CCS). This co-authored report by Global CCS Institute and University College London largely focusses on the storage aspect of the CCS process. Storage is where the most distinctive liability challenges lie, largely due to the long time-scales involved.

The authors address three types of legal liability:

  1. Civil liability where third parties who have suffered harm seek compensation or a court order.
  2. Administrative liability where authorities are given powers to serve some form of enforcement or clean-up order.
  3. Emissions trading liability where an emissions trading regime provides a benefit for CO2 storage and an accounting mechanism is in place should there be subsequent leakage.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Global CCS Institute submission to: the European Commission’s evaluation process of the Directive on the Geological Storage of Carbon Dioxide Directive 2009/31/EC
Global CCS Institute submission to: the European Commission’s evaluation process of the Directive on the Geological Storage of Carbon Dioxide Directive 2009/31/EC

27th August 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 storage, Law and regulation, Policy, Use and storage (CCUS)

This submission by the Global Carbon Capture and Storage Institute (the Institute) is in response to the European Commission’s (EC) request for stakeholders to participate in the review of the application of the EU Directive 2009/31/EC (CCS Directive) on the geological storage of CO2 and to provide an assessment of the state of CCS deployment and enabling policy in Europe.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

The Global Status of CCS: February 2014
The Global Status of CCS: February 2014

17th February 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Use and storage (CCUS)

This report is a follow-up to the Institute’s comprehensive annual Global Status of CCS report, most recently released in October 2013, giving an overview of significant international CCS project and policy, legal and regulatory developments around the world. The report is aimed as an industry guide for our Members and the broader CCS community.

Report highlights:

  • As of February 2014 there are 21 large-scale projects in operation or construction - a 50% increase since 2011. These have the capacity to capture up to 40 million tonnes of CO2  per annum, equivalent to 8 million cars being taken off the road. 
  • Six projects, with a combined capture capacity of 10 million tonnes of CO2 per annum, are in advanced stages of development planning and may take a final investment decision during 2014.
  • The world’s first two power sector projects with CCS will begin operation in North America in 2014.
  • The Middle East has the world’s first large-scale CCS project in the iron and steel sector move into construction.
  • China has doubled the number of CCS projects since 2011 with 12 large-scale CCS projects.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

CO2 pipeline infrastructure
CO2 pipeline infrastructure

1st January 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 transport, Use and storage (CCUS)

The aim of this study is to collate information from the public domain on existing CO2 pipelines into a comprehensive reference document. Other objectives are to discuss the similarities and differences between CO2 and other, specifically natural gas, pipelines and to provide an overview. The overall lessons learned from this study should support project developers, decision makers, regulators and governmental bodies who do not deal with engineering calculations and cost estimates on a regular basis.

Based on a wide range of interviews and literature, Ecofys and SNC Lavalin have gathered detailed information on 29 CO2 pipeline projects (out of more than 80 worldwide). This is now accessible as an interactive mapping tool.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Deployment of CCS in the cement industry
Deployment of CCS in the cement industry

1st December 2013

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Use and storage (CCUS)

A survey by the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEAGHG) finds that the majority of respondents in the cement industry think that CCS is relevant to them and are aware of research projects, with half involved in CCS activities. The survey and subsequent report were part of the IEAGHG’s research into the cement industry which is one of the largest industrial emitters of greenhouse gas, accounting for around 5% globally.

Sponsored by the Global CCS Institute, this independent report presents important findings to help the industry reduce emissions using CCS. The report establishes a range of techniques to reduce CO2 emissions from cement production along with increased energy efficiency. It finds the preferred techniques for capturing CO2 in cement plants are oxyfuel and post combustion capture. While oxyfuel is in general expected to have a lower energy consumption and costs than post combustion capture using liquid solvent scrubbing, it found disadvantages with pre combustion capture. Finally, the report provides an update on the legal and economic environment for CO2 related policies and regulations facing the industry.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Carbon capture and storage regulatory test toolkit for Victoria, Australia: outcomes and recommendations
Carbon capture and storage regulatory test toolkit for Victoria, Australia: outcomes and recommendations

19th November 2013

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Law and regulation, Policy, Public engagement, Use and storage (CCUS)

In 2013, the Victorian and Australian governments, in collaboration with the Global CCS Institute, deployed the Institute’s CCS Regulatory Test Toolkit (the toolkit) for the first time in Australia. The toolkit is a regulatory test exercise that aims to help governments establish whether their carbon capture and storage (CCS) legislative and regulatory frameworks are fit for purpose, providing a low-cost, low-risk approach to testing regional and national legislation and regulatory systems for CCS projects. The toolkit was originally developed for the Scottish Government and sponsored by the Global CCS Institute. It has since been deployed in jurisdictions such as Romania, Trinidad and Tobago, and Malaysia.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

GETICA CCS Demo Project Romania: financial scenarios report to the Global CCS Institute. Public report
GETICA CCS Demo Project Romania: financial scenarios report to the Global CCS Institute. Public report

24th January 2013

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Project financing, Use and storage (CCUS)

Given that electricity generation in Romania is primarily based on coal, implementing CCS would greatly reduce CO2 emissions while keeping coal-fired power plants operational. This financial scenarios report describes the optimum solution to financing a large-scale CCS project in Romania. It considered the challenges of finding and securing financing sources for the project. The existing financing sources, at European Union (EU) and national level, were analysed in terms of financing structure of the project, project eligibility, origin of financing (public/private), availability of funding, availability in time, and degree of certainty. Three scenarios were created, based on the prospected funding sources for CCS projects. A qualitative assessment was performed and, based on this assessment, the optimum scenario was chosen for the GETICA CCS Demonstration project.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

GETICA CCS Demo Project Romania: feasibility study overview report to the Global CCS Institute. Public report
GETICA CCS Demo Project Romania: feasibility study overview report to the Global CCS Institute. Public report

24th January 2013

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Use and storage (CCUS)

The Getica CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS) large scale demonstration project aims to demonstrate the application of large-scale integrated CCS to an existing coal-fired power plant in Romania's South West Development Region. The feasibility study for the CCS chain (capture, transport, storage) was performed by a consortium comprising the Institute for Studies and Power Engineering (ISPE), Romania; Alstom Carbon Capture, Germany; GeoEcoMar, Romania and Schlumberger Carbon Services, France. The key findings from the feasibility study are presented in this report.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

The CarbonNet Project
The CarbonNet Project

2nd November 2012

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 hubs, Use and storage (CCUS)

The CarbonNet Project in Australia is investigating the potential for establishing a world class, large-scale, multi-user carbon capture and storage (CCS) network. The network could integrate multiple carbon dioxide (CO2) capture projects in the State of Victoria’s Latrobe Valley, transporting CO2 via a common-use pipeline and injecting it deep into offshore underground storage sites in Victoria’s Gippsland region. The establishment of a successful CCS network would support the development of new industries in Victoria. Positioning Victoria as a hub for CCS provides a substantial opportunity for new jobs and to boost skills.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Valuation of potential risks arising from a model, commercial-scale CCS project site
Valuation of potential risks arising from a model, commercial-scale CCS project site

1st June 2012

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Engineering and project delivery, Health, safety and environment, Use and storage (CCUS)

A diverse group of organisations from industry, government, and the environmental community jointly sponsored Industrial Economics (IEc), an expert in environmental economics and natural resource damage assessment, to develop and test a model approach for valuing the economic damages arising from a well-sited and well-managed CCS project. These damages included environmental and human health impacts arising from a range of potential events such as pipeline ruptures and subsurface leakage. They do not address potential impacts from facility construction or routine operation, nor do they address potential impacts to workers, business interruption, facility repair or similar ‘private’ costs internal to the operator. The model was successfully developed and applied to a ‘realistic’ project based on the publicly available risk assessment for a site from the FutureGen 1.0 site selection process. The project was planned to inject 50 million metric tons of CO2 over 50 years and to have a 50 year post-injection period (for a 100-year analysis period).

This site-specific application of the model showed that the ‘most likely’ (50th percentile) estimated damages arising from CO2 totalled approximately $7.3 million and ‘upper end’ (95th percentile) estimated damages totalled approximately $16.9 million. On a per metric ton basis, these results translate into ‘most likely’ (50th percentile) estimated damages of $0.15 per metric ton and ‘upper end’ (95th percentile) estimated damages of $0.34 per metric ton. When combined, the estimated damages for CO2 and H2S were roughly 10-15 per cent higher.

It is important to note that the range of damage estimates is highly sensitive to site-specific data. The sponsor group concludes that the tools exist to estimate prospective financial damages. Further, the sponsor group has developed insight into the magnitude and timing of dollar amounts that are likely to be at risk and the conditions under which they may be at risk at a well-selected and well-managed CCS project. This analytic approach is based on generally accepted practices within the financial and insurance industries, and can be applied, with adjustment for location, to CCS projects around the world.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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