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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies Australia
Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies Australia

31st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

A number of elements of CCS policy and legislation in Australia could be considered "best practice":

  • in general terms, the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (CPRS);
  • well-funded and proactive government-business cooperative research centres such asCO2CRC; and
  • integrated CCS legislation at the Federal, Victorian and Queensland levels, which provides certainty to to market participants and clearly set out systems of property rights and liability regimes.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies China
Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies China

31st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

From now until 2020, the PRC aims to spend a significant portion of its own GDP on technology research and development. GHG reduction initiatives such as CCS could capture a significant portion of those funds.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies The European Union
Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies The European Union

31st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

The European approach to CCS policy and legislation represents some of the most comprehensive proposals for the regulation of commercial CCS facilities in the world. The CCS Directive, in particular, is a significant step towards the widespread deployment of CCS technology. It endeavours to remove regulatory barriers to CCS projects and, in doing so, amends a number of general European legislative instruments.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies India
Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies India

31st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

India does not currently have any integrated policies or legislation dedicated to encouraging the development of CCS technologies or regulating the conduct of CCS projects in India. The National Clean Development Mechanism Authority of the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, Government of India has initiated executive moves to investigate the potential of CCS.

To date, however, no CCS specific legislation has been implemented. The Government of India is in the process of creating public awareness and undertaking research and development for CCS technology and activities. Workshops and discussions are taking place throughout the country to investigate the potential for CCS in India.

It is foreseeable that the mandate for CCS would come under a broad legislative framework that would aim to limit India’s GHG emissions. Analysts are of the view that linking CCS with the CDM is necessary before India can support the inclusion of CCS under the CDM umbrella.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies Indonesia
Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies Indonesia

31st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

Indonesia has not introduced any policies or legislation dedicated to encouraging the development of CCS technologies or regulating the CCS project cycle.Indonesia has introduced a number of climate change and energy conservation policies which could provide a framework for high-level policy support for CCS incentives.

The Indonesian Government is cooperating with the governments of other countries including Norway and the United Kingdom to map potential CO2 sequestration sites in Indonesia.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies Japan
Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies Japan

31st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

Current government efforts to revise the Japanese legal system to facilitate CCS projects, and financial support for research, development and demonstration projects in the area of CCS are also a result of Japan’s commitment to CCS. The Government's Action Plan for Building a Low Carbon Society, released in 2008, aims to:

  • reduce the costs of CO2 separation and capture to around 2000 yen per tonne by 2015;
  • reduce the costs of CO2 separation and capture to around 1000 yen per tonne by 2020;
  • begin a large-scale CCS project early in 2009; and
  • work toward making CCS projects and technology accessible and possible to implement on a commercial scale by 2020.

This is to be done through, amongst other things, improving monitoring and environmental impact assessment capabilities and revision of legislation and regulations as required.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies Mexico
Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies Mexico

31st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

The National Strategy issued in 2007 considers CCS projects as priority field of research, due to their utility for CO2 capture potential, as well as the opportunity they present the state owned oil producing company, PEMEX. CCS projects may be feasible for the oil field of Cantarell and other declining oilfields to increase oil recovery.

Nonetheless, the National Strategy concludes that these projects are very costly. This may, however, be compensated by financing from CDM projects. The National Strategy also considers that further research is required regarding long-term environmental effects.

While there are is no CCS specific legislation or regulation, existing laws may be applicable to particular CCS activities. These laws may also provide guidance on the future approach taken by the Government in implementing a regulatory framework for CCS activities.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies New Zealand
Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies New Zealand

31st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

New Zealand has supported CCS in the international community and has participated in the research of CCS technologies. The New Zealand Government has monitored international CCS developments and created policy and research groups to determine how CCS may be deployed in New Zealand.This includes a review of the existing legislative framework and what amendments may be required, as well as research into potential CCS sites in New Zealand.

New Zealand appears to be in a unique position as a developed country with a high proportion of agricultural emissions.Currently, no legislation has been enacted that specifically applies to CCS in New Zealand. Existing legislation may be applicable to some stages of the CCS process, however a more comprehensive legislative framework is necessary before CCS can be deployed in New Zealand.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies Norway
Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies Norway

31st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

Norway has been active in CCS for more than 10 years and dedicates considerable levels of resource to CCS development and is considered by many to be a world leader in CCS development and deployment.

Norway has no dedicated CCS laws and would likely benefit from a more integrated approach, aimed at simplifying, streamlining and filling in gaps in CCS regulation (Birkeland, 2009: 23). Although Norway has chosen to adopt new European legislation on CCS, it is likely that it will choose to amend existing legislation rather than develop a dedicated CCS framework. An overhaul of existing legislation would require the investment of substantial time and resources and it appears that the Norwegian Government prefers to dedicate its resources to the development and deployment of CCS technologies on a case-by-case basis.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies Papua New Guinea
Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies Papua New Guinea

31st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

Papua New Guinea has not introduced any dedicated policies or legislation to provide incentives forthe development of CCS technologies or to govern the CCS project cycle.

However, the Government of Papua New Guinea is currently developing policies of relevance to CCS.The Government is developing a climate change policy which could provide a policy framework for CCS in Papua New Guinea. In addition, Papua New Guinea is working with international partners(including through its membership of the Global CCS Institute) to develop energy policies.

In addition, Papua New Guinea already possesses relatively well-developed mining, pipeline and oiland gas legislative regimes which could be adapted to allow the regulation of CCS activities in the country.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies Russia
Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies Russia

31st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

Russia has not yet been active in establishing policies and legislation to provide specific incentives for the development of CCS technologies and their deployment in test projects.

Presently, Russian legislation in traditional subject matters including environment, oil & gas and climate change is likely to govern any CCS project. This legislation cannot be characterized as a solid framework but rather as a combination of rules and procedures. One regulation that is expected to play a role specifically protects the environment and the atmosphere. This regulation, inherited from the Soviet system, obligates private parties to acquire environmental permits and follow emissions standards. Payment for exceeding such standards is the main regulatory mechanism used to enforcethis scheme.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies South Africa
Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies South Africa

31st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

There is no integrated policy or legislation currently to specifically deal with CCS in the Republic of  South Africa (South Africa). However, in recent years South Africa has moved towards adopting a climate change policy, and CCS is likely to be central to that policy.The Long Term Mitigation Scenario Study (LTMS) highlighted CCS as being a potential method of CO2 emissions mitigation for South Africa. Following this study, the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEAT) stated that one of its objectives was "exploring and developing CCS forcoal fired power stations and all coal-to-liquid (CTL) plants, and not to approve new coal fired power stations without CO2 capture readiness". DEAT also stated that a climate change policy is expected to be implemented by 2010 and a legislative, regulatory and fiscal package is planned to be introducedby 2012.

It is therefore clear that CCS is expected to play a vital role in South Africa's drive to mitigate its CO2 emissions. The South African government has declared CCS to be a national research priority and this commitment is underlined by South Africa's membership of the CSLF since 2003.The recently established South African National Energy Research Institute (SANERI) launched a National Centre for CCS on 27 March 2009. This research centre will drive CCS initiatives in South Africa, with the ultimate goal of undertaking a CO2 injection experiment by 2016 and the constructionof a CCS demonstration plant by 2020. The Centre receives funding from the British High Commission, the Norwegian Government and from industry.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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