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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies Russia
Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies Russia

31st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

Russia has not yet been active in establishing policies and legislation to provide specific incentives for the development of CCS technologies and their deployment in test projects.

Presently, Russian legislation in traditional subject matters including environment, oil & gas and climate change is likely to govern any CCS project. This legislation cannot be characterized as a solid framework but rather as a combination of rules and procedures. One regulation that is expected to play a role specifically protects the environment and the atmosphere. This regulation, inherited from the Soviet system, obligates private parties to acquire environmental permits and follow emissions standards. Payment for exceeding such standards is the main regulatory mechanism used to enforcethis scheme.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies South Africa
Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies South Africa

31st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

There is no integrated policy or legislation currently to specifically deal with CCS in the Republic of  South Africa (South Africa). However, in recent years South Africa has moved towards adopting a climate change policy, and CCS is likely to be central to that policy.The Long Term Mitigation Scenario Study (LTMS) highlighted CCS as being a potential method of CO2 emissions mitigation for South Africa. Following this study, the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEAT) stated that one of its objectives was "exploring and developing CCS forcoal fired power stations and all coal-to-liquid (CTL) plants, and not to approve new coal fired power stations without CO2 capture readiness". DEAT also stated that a climate change policy is expected to be implemented by 2010 and a legislative, regulatory and fiscal package is planned to be introducedby 2012.

It is therefore clear that CCS is expected to play a vital role in South Africa's drive to mitigate its CO2 emissions. The South African government has declared CCS to be a national research priority and this commitment is underlined by South Africa's membership of the CSLF since 2003.The recently established South African National Energy Research Institute (SANERI) launched a National Centre for CCS on 27 March 2009. This research centre will drive CCS initiatives in South Africa, with the ultimate goal of undertaking a CO2 injection experiment by 2016 and the constructionof a CCS demonstration plant by 2020. The Centre receives funding from the British High Commission, the Norwegian Government and from industry.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Best practices for: monitoring, verification, and accounting of CO2 stored in deep geologic formations
Best practices for: monitoring, verification, and accounting of CO2 stored in deep geologic formations

1st January 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

This document was developed by the US Dept. of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory for regulatory organisations, project developers, and national and state policymakers to increase awareness of existing and developing monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) techniques used during carbon sequestration.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Carbon capture and storage in the CDM
Carbon capture and storage in the CDM

1st December 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

The possible inclusion of CCS projects under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) raises a number of issues, including how to deal with potential leaks of CO2 and associated permanence and liability issues, what an appropriate project boundary is, how to deal with CDM-“leakage” (i.e. emissions resulting from the project activity beyond its boundaries) and what the possible impact of including CCS would be on the broad CDM  portfolio. This paper assesses these issues.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Carbon capture and storage at Mongstad
Carbon capture and storage at Mongstad

1st August 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

This project, the importance of which the government compared to landing on the moon, has been heavily debated in recent months. Removing and storing the carbon dioxide (CO2) from gas-fired power plants represents a much cleaner way to produce electricity and make use of fossil fuels. This is a new and costly technology. There is a lot of uncertainty associated with these costs, and as it turns out – the Mongstad project will not be in the lower range of these costs.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Amendments of Annex II and Annex III to the convention in relation to the storage of carbon dioxide streams in geological formations
Amendments of Annex II and Annex III to the convention in relation to the storage of carbon dioxide streams in geological formations

25th June 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

The Convention was adopted at a meeting of the Parties to the Oslo and Paris Conventions on the 21 and 22 September 1992. It entered into force on 25 March 1998.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Bellona's comments on carbon dioxide capture and storage under the Clean Development Mechanism
Bellona's comments on carbon dioxide capture and storage under the Clean Development Mechanism

31st May 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

There is considerable agreement among experts that Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) is a vital mitigation alternative for the coming decades. The potential of such technologies to reduce CO2 emissions from fossil fuel power generation is substantial. In addition, a transfer of CCS technologies from industrialised to developing countries can help ensure a more sustainable economic development.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Storing CO2 under the North Sea Basin: A key solution for combating climate change
Storing CO2 under the North Sea Basin: A key solution for combating climate change

1st January 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

This report represents the first deliverable of the North Sea Basin Task Force, which Norway and the UK established in November 2005 to work together on issues surrounding the transport and storage of CO2 beneath the North Sea. The North Sea represents the best geological opportunity for storing our CO2 emissions away from the atmosphere for both the UK and Norway. On 30 November 2005, Minister Enoksen of Norway and Minister Wicks of the UK agreed to establish a North Sea Basin Task Force, composed of public and private bodies from countries on the rim of the North Sea. Its purpose: to develop common principles for managing and regulating the transport, injection and permanent storage of CO2 in the North Sea sub-seabed.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Capturing the ‘C’ in climate change: CO2 capture and storage
Capturing the ‘C’ in climate change: CO2 capture and storage

1st January 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

This article attempts to provide an update on recent developments in carbon capture and storage (CCS), with particular emphasis on the legal and regulatory provisions that will need to be in place under international, EU and UK law to accommodate the new technology and the risks of storing CO2 underground.  This involves looking at how some of the recent developments link to the London Convention and its protocol, OSPAR, the UNFCCC and the Kyoto Protocol, and how the UK Government might proceed with regulating and licensing CCS in the United Kingdom.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

The future of coal in a greenhouse gas constrained world
The future of coal in a greenhouse gas constrained world

1st January 2006

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

An interdisciplinary group of MIT faculty and research staff have participated in a study to assess the contribution coal can make to the growing world energy demand during a period of increasing concern about global climate change. The study looks out to the year 2050 and assesses technologies and policies we should pursue in the short-term so that we can utilize coal in the longer-term and reduce its associated CO2 emissions by at least 1 GtC. This paper summarizes the findings from three key components of the study: future coal use, coal conversion technologies, and CO2 sequestration. The full report will be available over the internet in summer of 2006.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

European CO2 capture and storage projects
European CO2 capture and storage projects

10th September 2004

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

This publication provides an overview of the European Commission’s Fifth Framework carbon capture and storage (CCS) programme (1999-2002) and a snapshot of CCS projects funded under the Sixth Programme (2002-2006).

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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