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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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CO2の回収
CO2の回収

17th November 2015

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

インスティテュートは、CCSに関する基本情報をまとめたFACT SHEETシリーズを作成した。「CO2の回収 」は、CO2の回収過程に焦点を当て概要をとりまとめたものである。

Japanese translation of Capturing CO2.

 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Yanchang Petroleum report 1: capturing CO2 from coal to chemical process
Yanchang Petroleum report 1: capturing CO2 from coal to chemical process

16th October 2015

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

To promote the development of CCS in China, the Global CCS Institute and China National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) held a joint carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS) workshop in Yan’An China in July 2013. Out of this collaboration the Global CCS Institute has commissioned Yanchang Petroleum Group to produce four knowledge-sharing reports on its integrated CCS project.

This first report of the series discusses the capture aspects of Yanchang Petroleum CCUS Project. It highlights project achievements and lessons learned from the project.

Tony Zhang, Institute Senior Adviser for Capture, Asia-Pacific provides an overview of this report in an Insight available on the Global CCS Institute website.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

포집 플랜트와 발전소의 통합. 로테르담 포집 및 저장 실증 프로젝트. 글로벌 이산화탄소포집 및 저장 연구소(Global Carbon Capture and Storage Institute: 이하 글로벌 CCS 연구소)용 특별 보고서
포집 플랜트와 발전소의 통합. 로테르담 포집 및 저장 실증 프로젝트. 글로벌 이산화탄소포집 및 저장 연구소(Global Carbon Capture and Storage Institute: 이하 글로벌 CCS 연구소)용 특별 보고서

1st July 2015

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

본 보고서는 마스플락터 발전소(MPP3)에 현재 존재하는 화력 1,070 MW 3기와 Rotterdam Opslag en Afvang Demonstratieproject(ROAD)의 새롭게 제안된 250 MW 등급 탄소 포집을 통합시키는 데 중점을 두고 있다. 탄소 포집 기술은 이산화탄소 포집 및 저장(CCS) 비용을 절감하기 위한 방대한 연구 주제와 다양한 간행물의 주제가 되어왔다. 그러나 주요 발전소와의 통합은 또한 CCS 체인의 효율성 및 조작성에 중요한 영향을 미치며 본질적으로 상당한 프로젝트 비용을 차지하게 된다

Korean translation of Integration of capture plant and power plant, Rotterdam Opslag en Afvang Demonstratieproject: special report for the Global Carbon Capture and Storage Institute

 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Capturing CO2
Capturing CO2

5th May 2015

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

This fact sheet by the Global CCS Institute provides an overview of the different processes for capturing carbon dioxide emissions.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Development of an aqueous ammonia based PCC technology for Australian conditions: process modelling of combined SO2 and CO2 capture using aqueous ammonia
Development of an aqueous ammonia based PCC technology for Australian conditions: process modelling of combined SO2 and CO2 capture using aqueous ammonia

25th March 2015

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

This research project focuses on the development of the advanced aqueous ammonia based post combustion capture (PCC) technology. Two years into the project a novel process was proposed integrating CO2 and SO2 removal, flue gas cooling and ammonia recycle. Under the typical flue gas conditions, the proposed process has a SO2 removal efficiency of over 99.9% and ammonia reuse efficiency of 99.9%, which was confirmed by the experimental results. A rate based model was also developed for the aqueous ammonia based CO2 capture process and validated using the results from Munmorah Power Station pilot plant trials.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Mercury and SO3 capture by the fabric filter in oxy-fuel technology
Mercury and SO3 capture by the fabric filter in oxy-fuel technology

1st August 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

This project continues to study mercury removal from Oxy-fuel flue gas to reduce the associated costs and risks. It aims to quantify the extent of removal and the impact of impurities (SO3 and NOx) in the CO2. This report focuses on removing mercury with the presence of SO3 in the fabric filter. It concludes that, for practical carbon-in-ash levels, the competition between mercury and SO3 by ash can be neglected.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Development of an aqueous ammonia based PCC technology for Australian conditions: technical report no. 3
Development of an aqueous ammonia based PCC technology for Australian conditions: technical report no. 3

11th July 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

Post combustion capture of CO2 in power generation using commercial amines results in a significant efficiency loss (25-30%). Using an aqueous ammonia solvent can reduce this loss because it has nearly double the carrying capacity and 40% lower re-generation energy among other benefits.  Realising this potential requires promoting the rate of absorption and optimising its performance by establishing fundamental kinetic relationships for the reactions. This report delivers the data for the use of piperazine and proline as promoters. Results to date are equivalent to - though have not yet exceeded the performance of benchmark MEA at the high COloadings required for PCC. This project remains in progress.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Impacts of trace components on Oxy-combustion for the Callide Oxy-fuel Project: results from Callide fieldtrials, December, 2012
Impacts of trace components on Oxy-combustion for the Callide Oxy-fuel Project: results from Callide fieldtrials, December, 2012

11th July 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

Over a 3 week period in December 2012, the retrofitted Callide-A Oxyfuel demonstration power plant conducted an investigation into the behaviour of trace elements during oxy-firing and fluegas capture and processing.

This Macquarie University study is one of the first of its type at scale. Its conclusion suggests that the health and environmental outcomes under oxy-firing conditions are likely to be similar to those achieved when using conventional air-firing. Levels of metals, acid gases and mercury in particular, are below the level of operational concern in the CO2 processing unit after the first low pressure scrubber. The report contains a significant level of additional detail that will assist in both flowsheet design and environmental permitting for the technology.

 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Callide Oxyfuel Project: lessons learned
Callide Oxyfuel Project: lessons learned

1st May 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

The following report presents an overview of the Callide Oxyfuel Project (Stage 1 - Oxyfuel Combustion and CO2 Capture) and describes in detail key technical aspects of the plant, project milestones, and lessons learned.

The Callide A facility located near Biloela in central Queensland comprises of 2 x 330 t/day air separation units, a 30 MWe oxy-fuel boiler and a 75 t/day CO2 capture plant. The plant was commissioned in 2012 and as of March 2013 had achieved nominally 5500 hours of industrial operation in oxy-combustion mode and 2500 hours of industrial of the CO2 capture plant.

The project has been able to demonstrate CO2 capture rates from the Oxyfuel flue gas stream to the CO2 capture plant in excess of 85%, and producing a high quality CO2 product suitable for geological storage. In addition, other benefits observed from the oxy-firing and CO2 capture demonstration have included: (i) increased boiler combustion efficiency; (ii) greater than 50% reduction in stack NOx mass emission rates; and (iii) almost complete removal of all toxic gaseous emissions including SOx, NOx, particulates and trace elements from the flue gas stream in the CO2 capture plant.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Membrane reactor for hydrogen production
Membrane reactor for hydrogen production

30th April 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

This project aims to develop a catalytic membrane reactor (CMR), which intensifies hydrogen production processes and could lead to near-complete hydrogen conversion, purification and pre-combustion CO2 capture in a single device.

During this reporting period, a membrane module with a surface area of 500 cm2 was designed, constructed and tested. This represents a 250 fold increase in membrane surface area since the beginning of the project. Hydrogen flux has been consistently achieved at 40% of the US DOE flux target. With a minimal Pd consumption, this represents a competitive flux per capital cost ratio. Ongoing developments are also reported in the embrittlement-resistant vanadium alloy and the surface preparation procedure.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

CO2回収プラントの火力発電プラントへの統合
CO2回収プラントの火力発電プラントへの統合

18th April 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

本報告書では、既設の1070 MWのMaasvlakte石炭火力発電所の3号機(MPP3)と、新設が提案されている250 MW相当のRotterdam Opslag en Afvang Demonstratieproject CO2回収プラントとの統合プロジェクト(ROAD)について述べる。CO2回収技術については、CCSのコスト削減を目的として、これまでにも多数の研究や報告書で取り上げられている。しかしながら、大規模な発電所との統合もCO2回収貯留チェーンの効率および運用性に重大な影響があり、また、それ自体で相当額のプロジェクトコストが生じる。
本特別報告書は、ROADがグローバルCCSインスティテュートのために作成したものであり、ROADが発電所への統合をどのように達成するかについて述べている。

 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Development of an ammonia based PCC technology for Australian conditions: technical report no. 2
Development of an ammonia based PCC technology for Australian conditions: technical report no. 2

24th January 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

The size and cost of a CO2 capture plant will be directly related to the absorption and separation properties of the capture solvent used. For power generation purposes, commercially available post combustion capture technology is currently considered using amine based solutions, which are estimated to result in about 10% efficiency loss from power plants. This project investigates the potential of using aqueous ammonia as a low energy consuming, high CO2 absorption capacity alternative, with several other associated benefits. Six (6) chemical promoters were tested and the preliminary results show that with the aid of the promoters the mass transfer coefficient of CO2 more than doubled.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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