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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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Cooling alternatives evaluation for a new pulverized coal power plant with carbon capture
Cooling alternatives evaluation for a new pulverized coal power plant with carbon capture

1st August 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

The Tenaska Trailblazer Energy Center is expected to be the first new-build coal plant in the United States to incorporate a commercial-scale carbon dioxide capture plant into the initial design. The project is designed to capture 85 to 90 per cent of the CO2 that otherwise would be emitted into the atmosphere.

The CO2 captured from the project will be sold into the Permian Basin CO2 market in West Texas, where it will be used in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and ultimately stored permanently underground. The Trailblazer project will consist of both a state-of-the-art pulverized coal facility (PC Plant) and a carbon capture facility (CC Plant).

The project is located in a semi-arid area, with annual rainfall averaging about 22 inches (56 centimeters).  As such, very early in the project’s development Tenaska explored several cooling options, including air cooling, full wet cooling and partial wet cooling (hybrid cooling).  Through this high-level analysis and due to water rights restrictions -- and for other strategic reasons -- Tenaska assumed that Trailblazer would need to employ air cooling in order to reduce the PC Plant’s water usage. This report describes the process used to determine the best alternative for the project’s cooling systems.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Retrofitting CO2 capture to existing power plants
Retrofitting CO2 capture to existing power plants

23rd May 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

This study assesses at a generic level the relative merits of retrofitting CCS to existing power plants and building new plants with CCS. As such it focuses mainly on the question "is CCS retrofit worth doing" rather than "can it be done". The latter would need to be addressed by detailed site specific studies for individual plants, examples of which are being undertaken by other organisations. However, the study also reports on high-level assessments of the potential for CCS retrofits in various countries: the USA, UK and China.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Steam turbine generator configuration and sizing considering the impacts of carbon capture system availability
Steam turbine generator configuration and sizing considering the impacts of carbon capture system availability

1st March 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

The steam turbine configuration and sizing is a critical part of the design basis for the coal fired power plant, and in particular with plans for incorporating carbon capture and storage. This report, undertaken by Tenaska as part of its plant design work for the Trailblazer project, examined plant operating modes, part load operation, overall operability and ultimately the profitability of the plant given the markets for power and CO2 in Texas. Since the carbon capture process utilises approximately 30 per cent of the steam energy generated in the boiler, the key question addressed is should the steam turbine be sized for 70 per cent flow left when the carbon capture plant is running, or the full steam flow to generate more power when the carbon capture plant is off-line.

Tenaska worked with a number of major steam turbine generator (STG) manufacturers to develop steam/water cycles for the Project that would allow either the simultaneous generation of power and provision of steam for the flue gas carbon capture process, or operation power generation only mode with no steam to the carbon capture process. Project developers and technical staff may benefit from the lessons learnt from the Trailblazer project in this study.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

鉴于碳捕集设备可用性影响的汽轮发电机配置与大小考虑因素
鉴于碳捕集设备可用性影响的汽轮发电机配置与大小考虑因素

1st March 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

该项目是一个位于美国德克斯州诺兰县正处于设计时期的超临界粉煤发电厂,大约离德克斯州斯威特沃特九英里远。发电厂在碳捕集关闭下(CC OFF)的运营模式下的额定功率可达760百万瓦特。

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

이산화탄소 포집 시스템 이용 가능성의 영향을 고려한 증기 터빈 발전기의 배열 및 사이징
이산화탄소 포집 시스템 이용 가능성의 영향을 고려한 증기 터빈 발전기의 배열 및 사이징

1st March 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

본 프로젝트는 미국 텍사스주 스위트워터(Sweetwater) 동쪽으로부터 약 9마일 떨어진 놀란(Nolan) 카운티에서 현재 개발 중인 초임계와 분탄을 이용한 화력 발전소에 대한 것이다. 발전소의 통상 발전량은 CC OFF상태 하의 최대 발전모드에서 가동시 760 MW가 될 것으로 예상된다.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Development of the Tenaska Trailblazer Energy Center
Development of the Tenaska Trailblazer Energy Center

31st January 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

This paper discusses the development of the Tenaska Trailblazer Energy Center, a supercritical pulverized coal electric generating station under development in Nolan County, Texas, United States. The site is located approximately nine miles east of Sweetwater, Texas and it is expected to be the first new-build coal plant to incorporate a commercial-scale carbon dioxide capture plant into the initial design. This report describes the history of the project development and looks at some of the key challenges being faced by the Project, including permitting, water supply and financing.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Coal-fired power plants in the United States: examination of the costs of retrofitting with CO2 capture technology, revision 3
Coal-fired power plants in the United States: examination of the costs of retrofitting with CO2 capture technology, revision 3

4th January 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

Retrofitting existing coal-fired power plants to capture CO2 is an important GHG mitigation option for the United States. Coal power plants are large point sources and account for roughly 37% of total U.S. CO2 emissions. Also, retrofitting utilizes the base power plant and related infrastructure and so the cost and level of disruption could be less than other greenhouse gas mitigation options. NETL studied the 738 coal-fired generating units currently operating in the United States and estimated how much the capital cost and parasitic load for CO2 retrofit would vary from unit to unit. Site-specific characteristics such as base plant efficiency, whether or not the unit has a sulfur scrubber, the efficiency of the sulfur scrubber, how much water is available for the unit to use, and how much space is available for the CO2 capture and compression equipment were factored in to an estimate of CO2 capture cost at each generating unit.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Oxyfuel combustion of pulverised coal
Oxyfuel combustion of pulverised coal

24th August 2010

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

This report concentrates on the oxyfuel combustion of pulverised coal with recycled flue gas. Oxyfuel combustion is one of the leading options for power generation with CO2 capture. It can be simply described as a process that eliminates nitrogen from the oxidant or comburent by burning the fuel in either nearly pure oxygen or a mixture of nearly pure oxygen and a CO2-rich recycled flue gas (RFG) resulting in a product flue gas from the boiler containing mainly carbon dioxide and water vapour. Pulverised coal is burned with a mixture of CO2-rich recycled flue gas or steam (to act as diluents replacing nitrogen in order to moderate the temperature) in addition to the oxygen from an air separation unit. In the current design of the oxyfuel combustion for pulverised coal fired boilers, the CO2-rich recycled flue gas is used as the diluent. The contents of this report include: a discussion of ignition and flame propagation, combustion and burnout, and heat transfer.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Technology options for clean coal power generation with CO2 capture
Technology options for clean coal power generation with CO2 capture

1st July 2010

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

This paper provides an overview of the development status of CO2 capture technologies and discusses their expected performance and economic impacts, with special focus on post-combustion absorption and oxyfuel combustion which are promising near-term solutions of CO2 capture for new and existing power plants.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Evaluation of novel post-combustion CO2 capture solvent concepts
Evaluation of novel post-combustion CO2 capture solvent concepts

9th November 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

This review looked at solvents other than MEA that could be used for post-combustion CO2 capture in the near term. The purpose of this review was to outline the current state of knowledge and provide an assessment of the following aspects: 

  • Process chemistry and kinetics, 
  • Operational issues and major development issues, 
  • Qualitative evaluation of the performance of absorber and stripper column, 
  • Safety and Environmental Impact considerations. 
  • Technology maturity and reported time scale for commercialisation.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Partial capture of CO2
Partial capture of CO2

1st May 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

This report is a brief review of the technology and costs of partial capture of CO2. The report does not attempt to prescribe policies for mandating CO2 capture and whether partial capture should be part of a policy for reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. IEA GHG provides technical information which can be used by policy makers but it does not intend to be policy prescriptive.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Post combustion carbon capture from coal fired plants: solid sorbents and membranes
Post combustion carbon capture from coal fired plants: solid sorbents and membranes

1st April 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

This report will begin with mesoporous and microporous adsorbents in which CO2 adsorption is simply a physical process controlled by the pore characteristics of the sorbent. The addition of chemical functionality such as amine groups has been studied as a means of improving the performance of porous adsorbents so this will be discussed in the following chapter. The next chapter will examine regenerable solid sorbents, mostly involving a chemical cycle of calcination/carbonation reactions to capture the CO2 and then release it as a pure gas while regenerating the sorbent. A chapter on membranes will follow. The final chapters will provide a brief discussion on techno-economic studies followed by some comments and conclusions.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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