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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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Improved discretisation and dynamic modelling of CO2 solubility during injection and subsequent convective dispersion
Improved discretisation and dynamic modelling of CO2 solubility during injection and subsequent convective dispersion

10th June 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

Based on the Precipice sandstone of the Surat Basin, this CSIRO study looks at some of the errors generated in the numerical simulation of CO2 migration and dissolution that are caused by the necessity of using large grid blocks in the simulation of field size projects. In the injection stage of a simulation, large grid blocks will cause an overestimation of the amount of CO2 that will dissolve in the formation brine.

The study addresses some of the shortcomings in the scientific literature regarding the effects of coarse grids on the convective mixing process and proposes a scheme for correcting the observed error in the convection enhanced dissolution by using grid corrected fluid or reservoir properties.

 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Feasibility and design of robust passive seismic monitoring arrays for CO2 geosequestration: project results @ 6 months
Feasibility and design of robust passive seismic monitoring arrays for CO2 geosequestration: project results @ 6 months

1st May 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

This early progress report explores the opportunity to consider passive seismic monitoring for the South West Hub in the context of location specific variables. 

Passive seismic monitoring is the science of recording and analysing natural or induced seismicity with surface or borehole sensor arrays, without the use of costly and disruptive man-made seismic energy sources. Scientists are seeking to use such signals to monitor an injected CO2 plume.  

 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Comparing different approaches to managing CO2 storage resources in mature CCS futures
Comparing different approaches to managing CO2 storage resources in mature CCS futures

1st March 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

This study has been funded by the Global Carbon Capture and Storage Institute (GCCSI), through the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEAGHG). The report ‘Comparing different approaches to managing storage resources in mature CCS futures’ summarises the potential for surface and subsurface interactions which might occur during CO2 storage operations. It reviews the regulatory approaches in jurisdictions active in carbon capture and storage (CCS) to managing such interactions and the consequent potential adverse impacts. The authors discuss possible options for managing these interactions to provide timely storage capacity, illustrated with a regional case study from the Southern North Sea.

The report has been written by contributors from US, Australia, Netherlands and Canada, under the lead of the British Geological Survey, United Kingdom.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Final report on prospective sites for the geological storage of CO2 in the southern Baltic Sea
Final report on prospective sites for the geological storage of CO2 in the southern Baltic Sea

1st February 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

For this study, SLR was commissioned by Elforsk to identify and characterise the potential CO2 storage sites in the southern Baltic Sea, in a project sponsored by the Swedish Energy Agency, the Global Carbon Capture and Storage Institute and Swedish industrial partners.

The study determined that there is a theoretical regional capacity to store some 16Gt of COin the Middle Cambrian sandstone beneath 900 metres of caprock and 1.9Gt in the Dalders Monocline. There is theoretical storage capacity of some 743Mt COin hydrocarbon and saline structures, which are located mainly offshore of Latvia. On the basis of the data available, there is no effective capacity proven within these totals, although the Dalders Structure, with 128Mt, could be considered better defined, albeit still within the theoretical category range. Thus the study has established a relatively large theoretical storage capacity for captured CO2.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Basin resource management and carbon storage
Basin resource management and carbon storage

1st November 2013

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

The complexity of geological storage includes how carbon dioxide interacts with other resources - this will impact the ‘licence to operate’ a carbon dioxide geological storage site. In addition, the sensitivity to a ‘new player’ in the underground geological space has led to discussions around sub surface access priorities and potential resource conflicts. This two-part CSIRO report seeks to clarify the possible interactions in a range of potential geological settings as well as align ‘best in class’ international work to the Australian context to propose relevant ‘resource interaction’ decision flow charts.

Report Parts

  • Impacts of carbon dioxide storage [Executive Summary]
  • Part I: resource characterisation requirements and evaluation of containment risks at the basin-scale
  • Part II: Towards a workflow for the assessment of potential resource impacts for CO2 geosequestration projects

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

A deployment strategy for effective geophysical remote sensing of CO2 sequestration: Final report
A deployment strategy for effective geophysical remote sensing of CO2 sequestration: Final report

23rd October 2013

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

The report examines alternative geophysical methods to time-lapse seismic that might be deployed to monitor commercial volumes of stored CO2. It uses simple geological models for the South Perth and Gippsland basins to simulate the resolution of various techniques or combinations of techniques. Topics covered include lowering noise levels in data processing workflows, estimate noise in a time-lapse sense for shallow well receivers as well as ambient noise imaging for ocean bottom receivers. Whilst no alternative method or combination of methods appears to have the sensitivity to adequately replace a time-lapse seismic approach, the added information could greatly improve the resolution and sensitivity of time-lapse geophysical methods alone.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Authigenic carbonates as natural analogues of mineralisation trapping in CO2 sequestration: progress report and preliminary results
Authigenic carbonates as natural analogues of mineralisation trapping in CO2 sequestration: progress report and preliminary results

1st October 2013

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

Mineral trapping is the most secure form of CO2 storage, however, these reactions are likely to be very slow and have pre-requisition on the environment settings. An accurate model, able to predict the conditions required for acceleration of mineralisation trapping (in particular storage reservoirs), is the first step towards engineering to maximise storage security and efficiency. This project is currently working on the determination of groundwater chemistry and reservoir conditions responsible for natural carbonate mineralisation within the Great Artesian Basin. The ultimate goal is an understanding of the likelihood of engineered mineral trapping to maximize storage security and storage efficiency in the Surat and other onshore sedimentary basins. This is an interim report on research progress to date.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Authigenic carbonates as natural analogues of mineralisation trapping in CO2 sequestration: a desktop study
Authigenic carbonates as natural analogues of mineralisation trapping in CO2 sequestration: a desktop study

9th August 2013

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

This project is aimed at supporting CO2 storage projects in Australian sedimentary basins through investigation of the controls on carbonate authigenesis in freshwater aquifers as a natural analogue for mineralisation trapping. The literature review and desktop study provide a foundation that synthesises what is known about the controls on carbonate precipitation in aquifers with different chemistries, reservoir temperatures and available volumes of CO2. The parameters derived from this study will feed into simulations of engineered mineral trapping of injected CO2 that will then be tested experimentally in the laboratory with Precipice and Hutton sandstone core samples.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Relative permeability analysis to describe multi-phase flow in CO2 storage reservoirs
Relative permeability analysis to describe multi-phase flow in CO2 storage reservoirs

7th August 2013

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

Relative permeability is one of the most important properties influencing the fate and movement of CO2 in the subsurface. It is a parameter that quantifies the extent to which the injected CO2 and water interfere with each other as they migrate through rocks. Relative permeability measurements are also used directly in all of the mathematical approaches for predicting and matching the fate and movement of CO2 in the subsurface. Consequently, accurate measurements for this important parameter are indispensable.
The purpose of this report is to provide an explanation of the different methods used to measure relative permeability and to provide an objective review of comparable methodologies. The report will also include the identification of data gaps and the requirements to obtain additional material to provide a complete library of relative permeability measurements in varying brine compositions and rock types to represent as complete a suite of potential storage sites as possible.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Geochemical characterisation of gases, fluids and rocks in the Harvey-1 data well
Geochemical characterisation of gases, fluids and rocks in the Harvey-1 data well

1st August 2013

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

The Harvey-1 stratigraphic well, drilled in 2012 as a part of the evaluation of the area in South West Western Australia for a suitable carbon storage site, has undergone a geochemical evaluation. Two gas samples from the potential source of CO2 (CSBP and BOC in Kwinana) that may be piped south for a pilot scale test have been analysed and found to contain almost pure CO2, in excess of 98.3 mol.% with little in the way of organic contaminants. The carbon isotopic composition of this gas is 13C -37.6 ± 0.28 ‰, which is quite distinct from other background natural sources of CO2 and might act as a tracer in the future. Oxygen isotope data from the CO2 have been collected to build the database of information that can be used to understand trapping mechanisms and their contribution in the future.

Organic analyses were conducted on a series of core plugs and on some drilling fluids from equivalent depths. Extraction of the core plugs showed that while there was some hydrocarbons present in both the core and drilling fluids, the richest core sample has only a total extractable organic matter content of 304.93 mg/kg rock. The volumes measured were insignificant compared with source rock extracts or amounts seen in sandstone dominated hydrocarbon reservoirs which might contain upwards of 100,000 mg/kg rock. These low volumes indicate that there is no active source rock of quantitative significance in the immediate area of this well and means that there is unlikely to be any form of basin resource conflict in relation to oil or gas finds in the immediate area.

In conclusion, this current geochemical evaluation of the Harvey-1 well has used a combination of standard and novel techniques to show that the geology in this area appears suitable for geological storage of CO2 .

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

The role of storage standards in the deployment of CCS: workshop report
The role of storage standards in the deployment of CCS: workshop report

26th July 2013

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

The Institute hosted a workshop on 6 June 2013 in Calgary, Alberta, bringing together stakeholders from industry, government, non-government organisations and academia to discuss the role of storage standards in the deployment of CCS. The workshop focused on the implementation of CSA Z741, the standard for the geologic storage of CO2 for Canada and the United States.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Project Pioneer. Pioneer's sequestration research and proposed MMV programme: non-confidential report
Project Pioneer. Pioneer's sequestration research and proposed MMV programme: non-confidential report

23rd July 2013

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

This report represents the work and results accomplished during the initial phase of work done on Project Pioneer, with respect to sequestering CO2 in a deep geological formation. This report will also discuss some early geological studies (one of which preceded the inception of Pioneer), the drilling and testing of the evaluation well, as well as the detailed geological and reservoir models and the risk analysis that enabled the Project to develop a sequestration and MMV program complete with a cost estimate and schedule.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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