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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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二氧化碳技术评估、方法以及准则
二氧化碳技术评估、方法以及准则

1st January 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

这份报告描述由Tenaska 能源公司开展确认并选择首选供应商执行该项目的碳捕集FEED的流程。该流程产生了四个竞争性投标,包括碳捕集工厂的性能估计和指示性成本、公司FEED定价以及基于评估过程的一个明确的选择判决。该评估显示所有入围名单的供应商都具有竞争性的碳捕集FEED定价。这些选定的技术供应商取决于 30 年评估成本和流程商业经验。基于这两种情况下,Flour公司成为首选供应商。

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Pressurisation and brine displacement issues for deep saline formation CO2 storage
Pressurisation and brine displacement issues for deep saline formation CO2 storage

1st November 2010

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

This study examined the issues of brine and pressure displacement in detail, firstly through a review of existing information and published studies. The review included data and analysis of actual CO2 injection projects being undertaken in DSF around the world.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Injection strategies for CO2 storage sites
Injection strategies for CO2 storage sites

4th June 2010

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

Injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) into either deep saline aquifers, depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs or deep, un-minable coal seams is a promising option for the geological storage of CO2 in order to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. Previous studies and the experience from existing storage and enhanced oil recovery operations have shown that the technology and well design for carbon dioxide injection is well developed (Cooper, 2009). In addition, many studies all over the world have concluded that there is sufficient potential storage capacity in sedimentary basins for storing the global carbon dioxide emissions from industrial point sources (Bradshaw et al., 2007; Bradshaw and Dance, 2005; Li et al., 2005; USDOE, 2007). However, the current portfolio of storage operations does not sufficiently cover different geological environments and, more importantly, there is no experience with injection volumes much larger than 1 Mt CO2/year. At the same time, there are many uncertainties regarding the extent to which potential capacity can be turned into useable storage capacity, particularly when planning to inject large volumes in the order of several megatonnes of carbon dioxide that require multiple injection wells. It is now commonly accepted that, for geological storage to be an effective greenhouse mitigation option, the infrastructure (platforms, wells, pipelines, compressors) for injecting carbon dioxide will have to be at least on the order of magnitude of current petroleum installations. Also, injectivity of geological formations at an adequate distance from industrial point sources may be of lesser quality than has been encountered in existing projects. Reservoir quality information is particularly sparse for deep saline aquifers, resulting in large uncertainties in storage capacity estimations and forecasting of injectivity and sweep efficiency. In most cases, it can be expected that the CO2 injection scheme will have to consist of multiple wells, potentially including wells for monitoring and pressure control. Therefore, it is critical to develop efficient and cost-effective injection strategies that minimize the amount of wells and maximise the injection volume and injectivity.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

A review of the international state of the art in risk assessment guidelines and proposed terminology for use in CO2 geological storage
A review of the international state of the art in risk assessment guidelines and proposed terminology for use in CO2 geological storage

17th December 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

The report includes an updated version of the risk management framework that incorporates the Framework for Risk Assessment and Management of Storage of CO2 Streams in Geological Formations (FRAM) and the European Union CO2 Capture and Storage (EU CCS) directive steps, which is also consistent with the human health and ecological risk assessment workflows, as well as the Standards Australian/ Standards New Zealand (AS/NZS) for environmental risk management and security risk management. The report also includes a comprehensive list of terms used in various risk publications and extensive reference list.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Development of storage coefficients for carbon dioxide storage in deep saline formations
Development of storage coefficients for carbon dioxide storage in deep saline formations

17th November 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

Various Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) and IEA GHG publications have documented the complexity associated with estimating storage resources, and the ability to represent the information in a manner that truly reflects and expresses the uncertainty involved. A key criteria that remains unresolved, is how to take theoretical resources and convert them to realistic or viable capacities at a regional level. Existing published papers state that “storage coefficients” need to be applied to regional estimates to achieve this. Such coefficients would be dependent on storage type (i.e. deep saline formations, depleted gas or oilfield) and geological characteristics of storage formations. 

The aim of this study was to define a series of such coefficients, which can be applied to regional calculations to provide more realistic estimates. Coefficients were considered and derived principally for deep saline formations, reflecting the large storage potential but associated inherent complexity and uncertainty.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Best practice for the storage of CO2 in saline aquifers: observations and guidelines from the SACS and CO2STORE projects
Best practice for the storage of CO2 in saline aquifers: observations and guidelines from the SACS and CO2STORE projects

6th November 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

Many of the research results from the SACS and CO2STORE projects are published in the scientific literature but in a somewhat disseminated form. This report aims to consolidate some of the key findings into a manual of observations and recommendations relevant to underground saline aquifer storage. The work builds upon and complements earlier best practice manuals from the SACS/SACS2 and GEO-SEQ projects (SACS, 2003; GEO-SEQ, 2004), and aims to provide technically robust guidelines for effective and safe CO2 storage in a range of geological settings. This will set the scene for companies, regulatory authorities, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), and ultimately the interested general public, in evaluating possible new CO2 storage projects in Europe and elsewhere.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Long term integrity of CO2 storage: well abandonment
Long term integrity of CO2 storage: well abandonment

1st November 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

The report includes a high-level review of the variety of techniques that are employed around the world to facilitate well abandonment. The report describes the preliminary work necessary, such as removal of equipment from the well and cleanout of the wellbore before plugging can take place. The report outlines the basic principles involved in each plugging method and highlights the drawbacks and limitations of the methods.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

CCS site characterisation criteria
CCS site characterisation criteria

1st July 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

The IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEA GHG) has recently commissioned the Alberta Research Council in Canada to conduct a review of storage site selection criteria and site characterisation methods in order to produce a synthesis report. Among the various elements of the CO2 capture and storage (CCS) chain, the stage of storage site selection and characterisation is of critical importance because any storage site must demonstrate that it satisfies three fundamental requirements: 

  1. capacity to store the intended volume of CO2 over the lifetime of the operation, 
  2. injectivity, to accept/take CO2 at the rate that it is supplied from the emitter(s), 
  3. containment, to ensure that CO2 will not migrate and/or leak out of the storage unit (safety and security of storage). 

This report reviews the literature on the subject on site selection and characterisation since the publication of the IPCC Special Report on CCS, and provides a synthesis and classification of criteria.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Assessing European capacity for geological storage of carbon dioxide. D 26, WP 4 report: capacity standards and site selection criteria
Assessing European capacity for geological storage of carbon dioxide. D 26, WP 4 report: capacity standards and site selection criteria

16th June 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

The GeoCapacity project assesses European capacity for geological storage of CO2 in deep saline aquifers, oil and gas structures and coal beds. This publication reports on the site selection criteria required when considering sites for geological storage. It presents a site ranking methodology based on geological suitability for CO2 storage and on data availability and confidence.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

CO2 storage in depleted gas fields
CO2 storage in depleted gas fields

1st June 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

Three main CO2 geological storage scenarios may currently be considered as technologically-advanced – deep saline formations, depleted oil fields as part of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) schemes, and depleted natural gas fields. Much attention is currently focussed on deep saline formations due to these providing the largest theoretical global storage resource (10,000Gt according to the 2004 IPPC Special Report), and on CO2-EOR schemes due to the potential economic benefits. However, depleted gas fields offer significant advantages for CO2 storage: proven capacity and sealing structures to give confidence in storage security; and the presence of existing infrastructure that may be suitable for re-use in storage operations. Whilst some technical challenges remain – for example, controlling the flow of injected CO2 into de-pressurised formations where aquifer ingress is low or absent – storage in depleted gas fields could be regarded in some locations as an ‘early’ opportunity for large scale commercial storage. The southern North Sea provides an example of such a location, where a number of large fields are rapidly approaching exhaustion of recoverable natural gas reserves.

A key objective of this work is to advance the analysis undertaken in the IEA GHG report Barriers to overcome in implementation of CO2 capture and storage: Storage in disused oil and gas fields, which identified a total potential worldwide capacity of 923 Gt CO2, in depleted gas fields, of which 797 Gt is in depleted gas fields.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

1st CO2 Geological Storage Modelling Network meeting
1st CO2 Geological Storage Modelling Network meeting

1st April 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

The concept of this workshop was previously proposed to the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEA GHG) by BRGM and Schlumberger, and following the approval of the workshop in principle, discussion was initiated in June 2008 at the IEA GHG Joint Network Meeting in New York. The suggestion was that CO2 geological modelling for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) was an important topic not being adequately dealt with by the existing storage based research networks. Further discussions by these network groups concluded that this was indeed a gap, and that an initial workshop should be held to determine the viability of forming a separate network dealing solely with geological storage modelling.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Assessment of sub sea ecosystem impacts
Assessment of sub sea ecosystem impacts

1st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

One of the key elements required before receiving permission to commence underground storage of CO2, will be the ability of the operator to predict the behaviour of the injected CO2 and demonstrate a thorough understanding of the risks of leakage, and the associated impacts of these leaks. Also, CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS) operators must be able to demonstrate that CO2 can be injected into suitable storage reservoirs both safely and with minimal or no environmental impact. The safety aspect predominantly relates to good design and operational practices and strict adherence to accepted health and safety procedures. 

This study aims to assess the extent of information currently available on the effects of CO2 seepage on subsea ecosystems, and assess what gaps in knowledge exist, along with providing recommendations for further research to address these gaps.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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