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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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CCS in the Baltic Sea Region – Bastor 2. Work package 2: knowledge about environmental impact
CCS in the Baltic Sea Region – Bastor 2. Work package 2: knowledge about environmental impact

2nd April 2015

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Health, safety and environment

The objective of this study is to document current knowledge, hazards and risks on environmental impacts in a possible future CCS project in the offshore Baltic Sea Area. Another purpose is to also present a tentative EIA work plan for a field trial project as scoped out in Chapter 2. Further, the intention is to add new knowledge, if possible, to what is already known or applicable to CCS activities in the offshore Baltic Sea Area.

Yggdrasil Miljömanagement AB, together with panaware ab, were commissioned by Elforsk AB to document current knowledge about environmental impacts in the light of a possible CCS field trial project in the offshore Baltic Sea Area. This report is part of the project Bastor2 (Baltic Storage of CO2), with the overriding objective to assess the opportunities and conditions for CO2 sequestration in the region. The project, which ran from June 2012 through September 2014, was financed by the Swedish Energy Agency and the Global CCS Institute in collaboration with a number of Swedish industrial and energy companies.

 

 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

西オーストラリア州 温室効果ガスの回収・貯留: 二つのプロジェクトの物語
西オーストラリア州 温室効果ガスの回収・貯留: 二つのプロジェクトの物語

6th June 2013

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Health, safety and environment

西オーストラリア州では二つのCCSプロジェクトが計画されている。両プロジェクトとも、豪州連邦政府及び西オーストラリア州政府の共同パートナーシップによる支援を受けている。一方のプロジェクトは液化天然ガス(LNG: Liquefied Natural Gas)プラントから発生するCO2を貯留し、もう一方は石炭を燃焼する産業及び石炭火力発電によって生じるCO2を貯留する。両者が違う点は、社会及び環境への影響並びに貯留層の地質である。一方は動物相を保護する価値が高く、人の住んでいない場所に立地しており、他方は人口の多い農業地域である。また、一方には従来型の貯留用シールがあり、他方は複数のトラップメカニズムを採用している。両プロジェクトを合わせると、西オーストラリア州のCO2排出量の11%を貯留する容量がある。

本書ではこれらの最先端のプロジェクトの相違点及び共通点を検証する。

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Environmental non-government organisation (ENGO) perspectives on carbon capture and storage (CCS)
Environmental non-government organisation (ENGO) perspectives on carbon capture and storage (CCS)

4th December 2012

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Health, safety and environment

In order for global average temperatures to remain within bounds that may avoid the dangerous impacts of climate change, global CO2 emissions would need to peak within the next decade, and decrease at the very least by 50-85 per cent compared to year 2000 levels by mid-century. CCS is an important tool in the fight to reduce global carbon emissions for a range of reasons. This report looks at several core motivations for the deployment of CCS. The first reason is that it offers a pathway to reduce emissions from fossil-fuelled stationary sources. The heaviest carbon legacy that we have to deal with today is the vast installed base of fossil-fuelled industry. This base is projected to grow in most future economic scenarios, and would result in unacceptably high carbon emissions without policy action. A second reason is that the deployment of a portfolio of technologies is not only likely to increase the probability of delivering economy-wide emission reduction outcomes, but is also likely to result in lower overall costs of mitigation. The scale of emission reductions needed to combat climate change means that no single measure or technology is going to be able to deliver those reductions alone on the scale required. A third reason is that for some industrial applications, there are few other ways available today to achieve large emission reductions. The manufacturing of cement and steel, for example, emit significant amounts of CO2 as an integral part of the industrial process. A fourth reason is that when CO2 from facilities that use sustainable biomass is captured and stored, it results in net reductions of CO2 from the atmosphere. Biomass is a considerable energy source accounting for almost 10 per cent of the total global primary energy use as of 2010.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Zoback and Gorelick paper: unreliable conclusions
Zoback and Gorelick paper: unreliable conclusions

3rd August 2012

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Health, safety and environment

The CO2Geonet Network of Excellence, based on extensive studies and scientific literature on CO2 geological storage including seismic risk, states that the technology can be deployed in a safe and efficient manner to reduce CO2 emissions. They support the importance of a thorough research for each location in order to determine whether it is suitable for CO2 storage, both from a safety perspective and from the climate issue. Although Zoback and Gorelick describe a process that may eventually lead to the release of CO2, this and many other scenarios all form an integral part of any correct geological storage site-selection process. 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

How Australians value water: results from a literature review
How Australians value water: results from a literature review

1st June 2012

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Health, safety and environment

This intends to inform the reader of values and meanings relating to water in Australia, how these values break down by demographic group, and previous successes and failures in involving Australian communities in water-related decision making. In doing so, it aims to support mutual understanding and effective two-way engagement between the carbon capture and storage (CCS) industry and Australian communities, given that CCS, as an energy technology has potential impacts on water resources.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Western Australia greenhouse gas capture and storage: a tale of two projects
Western Australia greenhouse gas capture and storage: a tale of two projects

31st May 2012

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Health, safety and environment

This report, developed by the Western Australian and Australian Government, delves into the two current CCS projects being developed in Western Australia – the South West Hub and the Gorgon LNG Project. The similarities and differences between the Projects are discussed, including their social and environmental impact, and reservoir geology.

Together these projects have the potential to store 11 per cent of Western Australia’s CO2 emissions.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Mountaineer commercial scale carbon capture and storage project: draft environmental impact statement summary
Mountaineer commercial scale carbon capture and storage project: draft environmental impact statement summary

1st February 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Health, safety and environment

This Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) provides information about the potential environmental impacts of the proposed Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage Project which would use a chilled ammonia process (CAP) technology to capture approximately 90 percent of the CO2 from a 235-megawatt portion of AEP’s existing 1,300-MW Mountaineer Plant flue gas exhaust.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Environmental impacts of amine emissions during post combustion capture
Environmental impacts of amine emissions during post combustion capture

1st June 2010

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Health, safety and environment

This report contains summaries of the presentations on a variety of developments including updates on amines, use of ammonia as a solvent, ionic liquids, solid sorbents, pilot plant and demonstration projects, modelling activities and environmental impacts of post combustion capture.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Environmental evaluation of CCS using life cycle ssessment (LCA)
Environmental evaluation of CCS using life cycle ssessment (LCA)

1st May 2010

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Health, safety and environment

This is a useful synthesis report which can serve as starting point for a more ordered approach to applying life cycle assessment to carbon dioxide capture and storage. The scope of this study is to compare systematically the different approaches of fifteen LCA studies, to summarise the results, show the site specific differences, address methodological variations and formulate guidelines to assign the various conclusions gathered from the studies.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Safety in carbon dioxide capture, transport and storage
Safety in carbon dioxide capture, transport and storage

1st September 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Health, safety and environment

This study was contracted to the UK Governments main Health and Safety Laboratory (HSL) which has become involved in a number of issues relating to safety in CCS projects.

The study has been specifically designed to examine the saftey issues which are likely to arise when preparing saftey cases and planning emergency procedures for CO2 capture and storage (CCS) projects.

The study found that the industry has sufficient experience in its totality, some of it very extensive, to conduct CCS operations safely, however, unless this information can consistently be made freely available and accessible where it is needed, the safety of CCS systems may be jeopardized.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Carbon dioxide storage: geological security and environmental issues. Case study on the Sleipner gas field in Norway
Carbon dioxide storage: geological security and environmental issues. Case study on the Sleipner gas field in Norway

1st May 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Health, safety and environment

The Sleipner project is a commercial CO2 injection project and proved that CO2 capture and storage is a technically feasible and effective method for greenhouse mitigation. It further demonstrates that CO2 storage is both safe and has a low environmental impact. Monitoring is needed for a wide variety of purposes. Specifically, to ensure and document the injection process, verify the quantity of injected CO2 that has been stored by various mechanisms, demonstrate with appropriate monitoring techniques that CO2 remains contained in the intended storage formation(s). This is currently the principal method for assuring that the CO2 remains stored and that performance predictions can be verified.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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