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国連気候変動枠組条約(UNFCCC)科学上及び技術上の助言に関する補助機関(SBSTA)への意見書:  (FCCC/AWGLCA/2011/CP.17 [第79~86項]) – 新しい市場メカニズムの様式及び手続の策定
国連気候変動枠組条約(UNFCCC)科学上及び技術上の助言に関する補助機関(SBSTA)への意見書: (FCCC/AWGLCA/2011/CP.17 [第79~86項]) – 新しい市場メカニズムの様式及び手続の策定

10th August 2012

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

本意見書は、CCSがCDMに適格なレベルにあるとUNFCCCで承認されたこと(決議7/CMP.6)及びCDMにおけるCCSプロジェクトを支援する様式及び手続が第7回京都議定書締約国会議(CMP 7)で最近承認されたこと(FCCC/KP/CMP/2011/L.4)を特に考慮し、CCS技術から見た具体的な要件に焦点をあてている。 
当インスティテュートは、CDMにおけるCCSを制度化するための上述の決議を全面的に歓迎する。また、CDMにCCSを含めることが、気候変動による危機的な影響を回避できるレベルで地球規模の人為的なCO2排出を安定化させるという、UNFCCCの目標達成に大きく貢献し、関連する確かな削減効果に対価を与えるルールを制度化することによって、途上国及び先進国の両方で一様にCCSを実用的に導入できるようになると確信している。 
本意見書では、以下のテーマについて当インスティテュートの見解を述べる。 
1. 地球規模の気候変動緩和技術としてのCCSの役割 
2. どのように市場メカニズムはCCSの導入を支援できるか 
3. 炭素市場から学んだ一般的な教訓 
4. NMBMはどのように既存制度の取決めと連携できるか 
5. NMBMに対応する枠組みのための基準の策定

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

CCS Readyの政策及び規制の動向 CCS Readyの政策及び規制枠組みの実施に向けた進捗状況
CCS Readyの政策及び規制の動向 CCS Readyの政策及び規制枠組みの実施に向けた進捗状況

1st August 2012

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

広範な気候変動緩和戦略におけるCO2回収貯留(CCS: Carbon Capture and Storage)の役割の重要性に鑑み、各国政府はCCS Readyの概念について検討を進めつつある。欧州及び北米の多くの国は、化石燃料による発電並びに鉄鋼製錬、セメント生産、精油及び化学工程といった工業プロセスから発生する温室効果ガス、特にCO2の排出緩和を目的とする一連の政策の一環として、CCS Readyの展開を進めている。

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Thematic report: Regulatory development session May 2012
Thematic report: Regulatory development session May 2012

25th May 2012

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

This report presents the discussions, conclusions and actions agreed at a one-day thematic workshop on regulatory development which was held at the Schwartze Pumpe power plant, Germany 2012.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Tracking progress in carbon capture and storage: International Energy Agency/Global CCS Institute report to the third Clean Energy Ministerial
Tracking progress in carbon capture and storage: International Energy Agency/Global CCS Institute report to the third Clean Energy Ministerial

27th April 2012

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is recognised as being amongst the technologies with the greatest potential for achieving carbon dioxide emissions savings. In support of advancing global efforts to demonstrate and deploy large-scale integrated CCS projects, the Carbon Capture, Use and Storage Action Group (CCUS AG) presented seven substantive recommendations to Energy Ministers at the second Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM 2, Abu Dhabi, April 2011). The recommendations set out key actions in CCS financing, industrial applications, CO2 storage, regulation and knowledge sharing, aimed at closing the gap between current CCS development and deployment, and the progress required to achieve the level of ambition associated with CCS technologies.

This report provides an update of progress made by the twelve CCUS AG Governments that agreed to advance progress against the 2011 recommendations by the third CEM in London, April 2012 (CEM 3).

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Project Pioneer. An overview of federal and provincial regulatory frameworks and gaps that guide and affect implementation of CCS: A non-confidential report
Project Pioneer. An overview of federal and provincial regulatory frameworks and gaps that guide and affect implementation of CCS: A non-confidential report

4th April 2012

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

Project Pioneer involves the construction of a large-scale carbon capture facility at the Keephills 3 coal-fired power plant west of Edmonton, Alberta. The intent of this report is to provide guidance and reporting on the existing regulatory gaps that Canada and Alberta face as it relates to Project Pioneer and other CCS projects. This report will also seek to clearly outline for others what regulatory frameworks currently exist in both jurisdictions, as well as outline some of the work that the province of Alberta is conducting in the area of regulatory frameworks and enhanced collaboration with pertinent partners and levels of government.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Submission to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technical Advice (SBSTA): (FCCC/AWGLCA/2011/CP.17 [paragraphs 79 to 86]) – elaboration of the modalities and procedures for new market base
Submission to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technical Advice (SBSTA): (FCCC/AWGLCA/2011/CP.17 [paragraphs 79 to 86]) – elaboration of the modalities and procedures for new market base

26th March 2012

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

This submission focuses on the specific needs of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies, especially in light of the UNFCCC's acceptance of CCS as an eligible project level activity in the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) (Decision 7/CMP.6) and recent endorsement by the CMP 7 of the modalities and procedures supporting CCS projects in the CDM (FCCC/KP/CMP/2011/L.4).

The Global CCS Institute strongly welcomes the above decisions to institutionalise CCS in the CDM, and believes that its inclusion will greatly assist the delivery of the UNFCCC's objective of stabilising human-induced global emissions at levels that may avoid the dangerous impacts of climate change; as well as provide for a practical deployment of CCS in both developing and developed countries alike by institutionalising the rules that reward related credible abatement outcomes. 

In this submission, the Institute offers its views on: 

1. the role of CCS as a global mitigation technology; 
2. how market based mechanisms can assist the deployment of CCS; 
3. general lessons learnt from carbon markets; 
4. how NMBMs might interact with existing institutional arrangements; and 
5. elaboration of standards for a framework to accommodate NMBMs.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Submission to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technical Advice (SBSTA): Draft decision -/CMP.7: Modalities and procedures for carbon dioxide capture and storage in geological formations
Submission to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technical Advice (SBSTA): Draft decision -/CMP.7: Modalities and procedures for carbon dioxide capture and storage in geological formations

26th March 2012

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

In September 2011, the Global CCS Institute attended the UNFCCC's technical workshop on CCS in the CDM in Abu Dhabi. The workshop helped facilitate the UNFCCC Secretariat's drafting of the draft modalities and procedures (M&Ps) for CCS in the CDM that were ultimately considered and adopted by the CMP in December 2011.

While transboundary issues were comprehensively covered at this meeting, there was no substantive discussion on or any specific need identified for a global reserve provision to address the issue of non-permanence. Similarly, the consolidated views of Parties and accredited observers as expressed in the CMP 6 call for submissions in February last year (FCCC/SBSTA/2011/MISC.10) has no reference to any need of a global reserve to accommodate what should be, if due processes on site selection are observed and upheld, a relatively low risk of a non-permanence event occurring.

In summary, the Institute's position is that: 
- transboundary CCS projects should be considered eligible under the CDM and that the M&Ps be developed as soon as possible to provide for such projects; and 
- the financial provisions contained within the existing M&Ps are adequate and the need for a global reserve is unnecessary.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Report to the Global CCS Institute on legal and regulatory developments related to carbon capture and storage between November 2010 – June 2011
Report to the Global CCS Institute on legal and regulatory developments related to carbon capture and storage between November 2010 – June 2011

13th December 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

As a part of the Policy, Legal and Regulatory (PLR) team’s research and preparatory activity for the drafting of the Global Status of CCS Report 2011, a legal and regulatory scan of the CCS legal and regulatory environment was commissioned from Baker & McKenzie.

The study is aimed at providing a comprehensive overview of international, regional, national and sub-national legal and regulatory developments; including details of negotiations currently in progress, the signalled intent of future CCS legal and regulatory decisions and the status of implementation of regulation in a number of countries. Fifty-one jurisdictions were surveyed in total, including the EU’s Member States, Federal and state level jurisdictions in Australia and the US and those developing nations which are the focus of the Institute’s capacity development activities.

The Institute’s PLR team worked closely with Baker & McKenzie to develop the scope and format of the research; ensuring a detailed final report and accompanying legislation tables, as well as a process which is potentially replicable in the future.

For further information on this study, please contact Ian Havercroft, Senior Advisor – CCS Regulation.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Developing CCS projects under the Clean Development Mechanism
Developing CCS projects under the Clean Development Mechanism

23rd November 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

Taking into account this backdrop, this report sets out some of the key considerations for implementing CCS projects under the CDM and potentially other forms of climate finance in the future. The aim is to provide the reader with the necessary basic information to begin identifying and conceptualising CCS projects under the CDM, begin building the business case, evaluating methodological aspects, and identifying regulatory issues and risks for establishing such a project in a developing country.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Case studies on the implementation of Directive 2009/31/EC on the geological storage of carbon dioxide: Germany
Case studies on the implementation of Directive 2009/31/EC on the geological storage of carbon dioxide: Germany

1st November 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

The Carbon Capture Legal Programme launched the 'EU Case Studies Project' in January 2010. The project analyses the implementation of Directive 2009/31/EC on the geological storage of carbon dioxide (‘CCS Directive’) in selected European jurisdictions - the United Kingdom, Germany, Poland, Romania, Spain and Norway. Each jurisdiction, for distinct reasons, provides an example of different approaches to the transposition and to CCS in general. The objective of the project is to identify some of the more subtle nuances in different legal cultures and to provide a better understanding of the rationale for national decisions in specific aspects of the implementation of the Directive. In particular, the focus is on those areas where the Directive leaves room for Member States' discretion or is ambiguous or silent. The project also considers the policy and political context within which the national legal and regulatory framework for CCS has emerged. The studies are deliberately designed to move beyond formal transposition measures to reveal more of the underlying dynamics and tensions involved in national implementation. Such elements are often crucial in driving domestic legal developments. The way in which EU Directives are implemented often reflects distinct legal and administrative traditions, and the case studies seek to present these in order to provide better insights on the development of CCS regulation. The outcome of the project is a series of reports from the six jurisdictions, based on key legal and policy questions and on a critical reading of the CCS Directive. The CCLP has coordinated the overall research and has carried out the UK case study. Independent experts have been commissioned to carry out research in Germany, Poland, Romania, Spain and Norway.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Update on selected regulatory issues for CO2 capture and geological storage
Update on selected regulatory issues for CO2 capture and geological storage

1st November 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

This report provides an up-to-date review of a number of regulatory issues applicable to CCS projects identified as priority areas by the CCP3 team, and identifies potential barriers or gaps. The report also presents a survey of existing and emerging monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) guidelines and requirements applicable to CCS, as well as perspectives from CCS project developers and regulators on key regulatory issues.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Case studies on the implementation of Directive 2009/31/EC on the geological storage of carbon dioxide: Norway
Case studies on the implementation of Directive 2009/31/EC on the geological storage of carbon dioxide: Norway

1st November 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

The Carbon Capture Legal Programme launched the 'EU Case Studies Project' in January 2010. The project analyses the implementation of Directive 2009/31/EC on the geological storage of carbon dioxide (‘CCS Directive’) in selected European jurisdictions - the United Kingdom, Germany, Poland, Romania, Spain and Norway. Each jurisdiction, for distinct reasons, provides an example of different approaches to the transposition and to CCS in general. The objective of the project is to identify some of the more subtle nuances in different legal cultures and to provide a better understanding of the rationale for national decisions in specific aspects of the implementation of the Directive. In particular, the focus is on those areas where the Directive leaves room for Member States' discretion or is ambiguous or silent. The project also considers the policy and political context within which the national legal and regulatory framework for CCS has emerged. The studies are deliberately designed to move beyond formal transposition measures to reveal more of the underlying dynamics and tensions involved in national implementation. Such elements are often crucial in driving domestic legal developments. The way in which EU Directives are implemented often reflects distinct legal and administrative traditions, and the case studies seek to present these in order to provide better insights on the development of CCS regulation. The outcome of the project is a series of reports from the six jurisdictions, based on key legal and policy questions and on a critical reading of the CCS Directive. The CCLP has coordinated the overall research and has carried out the UK case study. Independent experts have been commissioned to carry out research in Germany, Poland, Romania, Spain and Norway.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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