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Case studies on the implementation of Directive 2009/31/EC on the geological storage of carbon dioxide: Spain
Case studies on the implementation of Directive 2009/31/EC on the geological storage of carbon dioxide: Spain

1st November 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

The Carbon Capture Legal Programme launched the 'EU Case Studies Project' in January 2010. The project analyses the implementation of Directive 2009/31/EC on the geological storage of carbon dioxide (‘CCS Directive’) in selected European jurisdictions - the United Kingdom, Germany, Poland, Romania, Spain and Norway. Each jurisdiction, for distinct reasons, provides an example of different approaches to the transposition and to CCS in general. The objective of the project is to identify some of the more subtle nuances in different legal cultures and to provide a better understanding of the rationale for national decisions in specific aspects of the implementation of the Directive. In particular, the focus is on those areas where the Directive leaves room for Member States' discretion or is ambiguous or silent. The project also considers the policy and political context within which the national legal and regulatory framework for CCS has emerged. The studies are deliberately designed to move beyond formal transposition measures to reveal more of the underlying dynamics and tensions involved in national implementation. Such elements are often crucial in driving domestic legal developments. The way in which EU Directives are implemented often reflects distinct legal and administrative traditions, and the case studies seek to present these in order to provide better insights on the development of CCS regulation. The outcome of the project is a series of reports from the six jurisdictions, based on key legal and policy questions and on a critical reading of the CCS Directive. The CCLP has coordinated the overall research and has carried out the UK case study. Independent experts have been commissioned to carry out research in Germany, Poland, Romania, Spain and Norway.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Case studies on the implementation of Directive 2009/31/EC on the geological storage of carbon dioxide: Germany
Case studies on the implementation of Directive 2009/31/EC on the geological storage of carbon dioxide: Germany

1st November 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

The Carbon Capture Legal Programme launched the 'EU Case Studies Project' in January 2010. The project analyses the implementation of Directive 2009/31/EC on the geological storage of carbon dioxide (‘CCS Directive’) in selected European jurisdictions - the United Kingdom, Germany, Poland, Romania, Spain and Norway. Each jurisdiction, for distinct reasons, provides an example of different approaches to the transposition and to CCS in general. The objective of the project is to identify some of the more subtle nuances in different legal cultures and to provide a better understanding of the rationale for national decisions in specific aspects of the implementation of the Directive. In particular, the focus is on those areas where the Directive leaves room for Member States' discretion or is ambiguous or silent. The project also considers the policy and political context within which the national legal and regulatory framework for CCS has emerged. The studies are deliberately designed to move beyond formal transposition measures to reveal more of the underlying dynamics and tensions involved in national implementation. Such elements are often crucial in driving domestic legal developments. The way in which EU Directives are implemented often reflects distinct legal and administrative traditions, and the case studies seek to present these in order to provide better insights on the development of CCS regulation. The outcome of the project is a series of reports from the six jurisdictions, based on key legal and policy questions and on a critical reading of the CCS Directive. The CCLP has coordinated the overall research and has carried out the UK case study. Independent experts have been commissioned to carry out research in Germany, Poland, Romania, Spain and Norway.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Update on selected regulatory issues for CO2 capture and geological storage
Update on selected regulatory issues for CO2 capture and geological storage

1st November 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

This report provides an up-to-date review of a number of regulatory issues applicable to CCS projects identified as priority areas by the CCP3 team, and identifies potential barriers or gaps. The report also presents a survey of existing and emerging monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) guidelines and requirements applicable to CCS, as well as perspectives from CCS project developers and regulators on key regulatory issues.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Spanish view to early support policies in a changing world
Spanish view to early support policies in a changing world

9th June 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

Presentation outling the Spanish perspective on CCS developments in Europe.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Carbon capture and storage: Legal and regulatory review
Carbon capture and storage: Legal and regulatory review

30th May 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

The International Energy Agency (IEA) considers carbon capture and storage (CCS) a crucial part of worldwide efforts to limit global warming by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The IEA has estimated that the broad deployment of low-carbon energy technologies could reduce projected 2050 emissions to half 2005 levels – and that CCS could contribute about one-fifth of those reductions. Reaching that goal, however, would require around 100 CCS projects to be implemented by 2020 and over 3000 by 2050.

The IEA's CCS Review collates contributions by national and regional governments, as well as leading organisations engaged in CCS regulatory activities. Produced bi-annually, the CCS Review serves as a resource for regulators and other stakeholders involved in developing CCS legal and regulatory frameworks worldwide.

Each contribution provides a short summary of recent and anticipated CCS regulatory developments within a given country, region or by a specific organisation. Each edition of the CCS Review will also highlight a particular regulatory theme and include a brief IEA analysis of key advances and trends.

  • The first edition was released on 22 October 2010 and focuses on CCS legal and regulatory matters.
  • The second edition was released on 25 May 2011 and focuses on long-term liability for stored CO2.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Potential impacts of CCS on the CDM
Potential impacts of CCS on the CDM

20th April 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

The first result of this study is a marginal abatement cost curve (MAC) for CCS in developing countries for 2020. Based on existing MAC studies, the IEA CCS Roadmap and an overview of ongoing and planned CCS activities, we compiled three scenarios for CCS in the power, industry and upstream sector, as shown below. The major part of the potential below $30/tCO2eq (70 –100 MtCO2/yr) is in the natural gas processing sector. The most important region is the MiddleEast and North Africa, followed by Asia-Pacific. These MACs are relevant for gaining insight in how CCS opportunities in developing countries can be supported in 2020, under the CDM, other carbon credit mechanisms, or non-market instruments.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

International CCS policy after Copenhagen: An update
International CCS policy after Copenhagen: An update

19th April 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

CO2 capture and storage features in international climate policy under the UNFCCC as well as in other international forums. This report gives an update of the current and potential future role of CCS in the carbon market, climate negotiations after the Copenhagen and Cancun climate conferences in December 2009 and 2010, respectively, and in multilateral partnerships. These issues are summarised in two presentations on these topics as presented at CCS-related conferences in the Netherlands in June 2010.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

CCS実施の指針となり、また、影響を与える連邦及び州の規制枠組み並びに不備な点の概要公開報告書
CCS実施の指針となり、また、影響を与える連邦及び州の規制枠組み並びに不備な点の概要公開報告書

1st April 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

本報告書の目的は、CO2回収貯留(CCS)プロジェクトに関して現在カナダ政府及びアルバータ州政府が直面する規制上の不備な点について、指針を提供・報告をするものである。さらに現在、カナダ政府及びアルバータ州のそれぞれの管轄区域にどのような規制枠組みが存在しているのかを明示するとともに、規制枠組みの領域でアルバータ州が行っている取組並びに関連パートナー及び政府レベルの連携強化についての概要説明を目的とする。

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Pioneer 프로젝트 연방 및 주정부 규제 체계 개관
Pioneer 프로젝트 연방 및 주정부 규제 체계 개관

1st April 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

본 보고서의 목적은 CCS프로젝트에 있어 캐나다와 앨버타가 직면하는 규제 상의 간격을 살펴보고 지침을 제시하기 위함이다. 또한 관할권에 현존하는 규제 체계와 정부 혹은 기타 파트너와 협력에 관한 적절한 정보도 제공한다.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

A bridge to a greener Greece: A realistic assessment of CCS potential
A bridge to a greener Greece: A realistic assessment of CCS potential

23rd March 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

There is some discussion regarding the potential application of CCS in but most analysts do not go beyond a strict evaluation of an initial demonstration project. The goal of this report – executed by Bellona Foundation and co-funded by the Global CCS Institute, among other sponsors - is to cover that gap and offer a realistic long-term appraisal of the economic and environmental consequences of broad CCS application in Greece in the power and heavy industry sectors.

The report identifies three possible scenarios for how Greece may address its emission mitigation challenge through 2050: No deployment of CCS, constrained deployment, or full deployment. The report finds that the full deployment scenario delivers not only the deepest emission cuts, but also the lowest electricity production costs. Further,  combining full deployment of CCS with biomass co-firing with coal would allow the Greek power sector to become ‘carbon-negative’ by 2030, actually removing CO2 from the atmosphere by producing power.

On a plant-by-plant basis, this report calculates which power plants and industry greenhouse gas emission sources are viable CCS candidates, while making specific proposals regarding CCS application for particular units and suitable storage sites. It also provides an overview of the current status of CCS potential in Greece, including relevant actors, the status of implementation of the CCS directive, and practical recommendations to decision-makers to assure timely deployment of CCS.

The result of this comparative exercise demonstrates that wide and timely deployment of CCS in both industry and energy sectors delivers optimal economic and environmental outcomes. By 2050, full deployment of CCS - together with wide application of biomass co-firing - could lead to a ‘carbon negative’ electricity sector and a nearly carbon neutral industrial sector, paving the way for a sustainable Greek economy long into the future.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Economic assessment of carbon capture and storage technologies: 2011 update
Economic assessment of carbon capture and storage technologies: 2011 update

8th March 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

This report presents an update of the economics of carbon capture and storage (CCS) prepared in 2009. The 2009 report was commissioned by the Global CCS Institute and delivered as Foundation Report Two in the series of five studies undertaken as part of the strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage.

Foundation report two involved a detailed analysis of the capture, transport and storage costs for power plants and a select range of industrial applications. This report presents a transparent methodology that uses updated and refined costs to reflect changes in the market since 2009.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Policy instruments for advancing CCS in Dutch power generation
Policy instruments for advancing CCS in Dutch power generation

1st December 2010

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

Decarbonisation policy in the Netherlands is heavily dependent on the success of carbon capture and storage (CCS). This report discusses several ways to stimulate CCS in the power sector after the round of demonstration activities that are to start around 2015. It describes recent policy developments in the UK, the US and Germany. It concludes that a policy package is the most useful way forward, including a financial incentive to cover additional costs of CCS and a regulatory instrument such as an emissions performance standard (EPS) or other regulation for new coal-fired power plants. It investigates the impact of different variants of policy packages on the Dutch electricity market, including wholesale market prices, CO2 emissions and export. It looks at pros and cons of various financial instruments and considers possible restrictions the EU legal framework might pose.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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