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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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Advancing technology transfer for climate change mitigation: Considerations for technology orientated agreements promoting energy efficiency and carbon capture and storage (CCS)
Advancing technology transfer for climate change mitigation: Considerations for technology orientated agreements promoting energy efficiency and carbon capture and storage (CCS)

1st January 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

The study examines the international governance of technology transfer, the performance of different instruments in delivering new technologies, and reviews proposals aiming at increased technology transfer. The study further examines a number of critical (pre)conditions for technology oriented treaties that can effectively promote technology transfer both within or outside the UNFCCC framework - in two technology spheres: carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies, and technical applications for energy efficiency within the building sector.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Climate change and carbon sequestration: Assessing a liability regime for long-term storage of carbon dioxide
Climate change and carbon sequestration: Assessing a liability regime for long-term storage of carbon dioxide

7th August 2008

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

As the world struggles with how to address climate change, one of the most significant questions is how to reduce increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. One promising technology is “carbon capture and sequestration” (CCS) which consists of capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from power plants and industrial sources and sequestering them in deep geologic formations for long periods of time. Areas for potential CO2 sequestration include oil and gas fields, saline aquifers, and coal seams. As Congress and the private sector begin to spend billions of dollars to research and deploy this technology, there has been insufficient attention paid to how to structure legal liability for the short-term or long-term risks associated with the geologic sequestration of CO2 in connection with CCS. Until now, federal and state legislators, when they have acted at all, have appeared to be in a rush to limit corporate liability for potential harm in order to encourage the development of CCS. We take a different approach. In this Article, we survey the existing environmental law and tort law liability regimes that may cover potential harm from escaping or migrating CO2. We conclude that while existing liability regimes are insufficient on their own to govern the CCS industry, existing federal and state environmental and tort liability can provide important risk management tools and serve as safeguards to private parties and state and local governments in the event of harm. Thus, state and federal legislation specific to CCS should leave in place this basic liability for full-scale commercial CCS projects. We also propose an adaptive governance model at the federal level for integrating several different compensation mechanisms including bonding, insurance, and pooled federal funding into commercial CCS project management to better provide financial security to investors without destroying existing liability protections for those who may suffer harm from CCS.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Early deployment: maximizing carbon capture and storage under the Lieberman Warner Global Warming Bill
Early deployment: maximizing carbon capture and storage under the Lieberman Warner Global Warming Bill

1st April 2008

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

This paper presents a detailed analysis of the cost-effectiveness and overall impact on CCS deployment of the bonus allowance and incremental cost (performance standard) subsidy mechanisms.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

From EOR to CCS: The evolving legal and regulatory framework for carbon capture and storage
From EOR to CCS: The evolving legal and regulatory framework for carbon capture and storage

1st January 2008

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

Carbon capture and storage has been proposed around the world as a potentially key technology for reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The United States oil and gas industry has a long experience in transporting, injecting, and effectively storing CO2 in tertiary oil recovery operations usually known as Enhanced Oil Recovery. As a result, there already exists a legal and regulatory framework that addresses many – but not all – of the issues that will need to be addressed if carbon capture and storage is to be adopted by policymakers as part of a carbon regulation regime. A review of that existing framework allows identification of those aspects that appear adequate to govern the sale, transport, and injection of CO2 for carbon capture and storage purposes as well as those that do not. Building on this analysis, the authors conclude that the current legal framework will be largely adequate from a transactional and interim standpoint to allow parties to structure a relatively seamless transition from CO2 storage that is an incidental result of oil production operations to those incremental injections of CO2 intended solely for permanent underground storage. The authors also suggest some possible approaches for crafting new rules to fill potentially remaining legal or regulatory gaps.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Regulation of carbon capture and storage
Regulation of carbon capture and storage

1st January 2008

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

This policy brief concentrates on a key institutional barrier: the defi cit of regulatory frameworks for capture and storage of CO2. It builds upon IRGC commissioned papers and a workshop involving eleven international teams which was held in Washington DC in March 20071 and from comments and presentations made during a conference held in November 2007 at the Swiss Re Centre for Global Dialogue, Rüschlikon, Switzerland.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Carbon capture and storage projects under the climate policy regime: The case of Halten CO2
Carbon capture and storage projects under the climate policy regime: The case of Halten CO2

1st December 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

The aim of this study is to assess institutional, political and legislative issues associated with the planned “CO2 value chain from Tjeldbergodden to Draugen and Heidrun” industrial project. The Draugen and Heidrun oil reservoirs are two important components of the value chain and are situated on the Halten Bank off mid-Norway. For short we refer to the project as the “Halten CO2 project”. This study is supplemented by an economic study and a study of legislative issues. The economic study is carried out by CICERO and focuses on the social value of the Tjeldbergodden industrial project. The legislative study focuses on environmental liability, discusses the relevant Norwegian legislation, and point out which adjustments Norwegian authorities should consider before CO2 chains become operative in Norway. It is carried out by the Scandinavian Institute of Marine Law at University of Oslo (Berger, 2007a and 2007b).

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Convention for the protection of the marine environment of the north-east atlantic
Convention for the protection of the marine environment of the north-east atlantic

25th June 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

The Convention was adopted at a meeting of the Parties to the Oslo and Paris Conventions on the 21 and 22 September 1992. It entered into force on 25 March 1998.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Technical support for an enabling policy framework for carbon dioxide capture and geological storage
Technical support for an enabling policy framework for carbon dioxide capture and geological storage

1st April 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

This paper presents a high level view of the key policy options for regulating CO2 capture and storage (CCS) activities in the EU. Also outlined are some suggested issues and amendments to existing EU legislation that will be required in order to clarify their scope, confer their provisions or remove them as potential barriers.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Carbon capture and storage: A legal perspective
Carbon capture and storage: A legal perspective

1st January 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

This paper provides an up-to-date examination of a number of key existing CCS legal mechanisms and regulatory options at EU and international level and proposals for their change, which it is hoped, could eventually resolve some issues of legal ambiguity.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

International carbon capture and storage projects: overcoming legal barriers
International carbon capture and storage projects: overcoming legal barriers

23rd June 2006

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

This paper examines regulatory developments of major CCS projects to determine actual progress in regulating such projects. There are five case studies of CCS projects that range from enhanced resource recovery to direct storage and which have been developed for a mix of purposes, such as commercial, research and development, and pilot demonstrations. These case studies indicate that regulatory progress varies greatly among projects, and differs depending on the size, scope, and the location of the projects. The focus of this report is the legal and regulatory context for international projects, but it should be recognised that CCS field projects in the United States are also addressing many of the regulatory issues related to CCS.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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