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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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Closing the gap on climate: why CCS is a vital part of the solution
Closing the gap on climate: why CCS is a vital part of the solution

17th December 2015

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation, Domestic policy

The ENGO Network on CCS actively advocates for policies that will lead to the rapid uptake of low carbon technologies and climate change mitigation strategies.

Following the Network's 2012 paper, this work re-examines the role of CCS as a technology traditionally perceived as specific to coal-fired power generation, but whose value is now widely recognised as much broader: in the decarbonisation of power generation fuelled by natural gas, in the industrial sector, and in the increased focus on removing carbon from the atmosphere through bio-CCS.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Global CCS Institute submission to: the European Commission's consultative communication on the future of carbon capture and storage in Europe
Global CCS Institute submission to: the European Commission's consultative communication on the future of carbon capture and storage in Europe

11th July 2013

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation, Domestic policy

Earlier this year, the European Commission initiated a debate on the options available to ensure the timely development of CCS and released a Consultative Communication on The future of Carbon Capture and Storage in Europe.

The need for the debate is driven by recognition that fossil fuels will remain an integral part of the future energy mix in the European Union. At the same time the challenges experienced in successfully establishing any large-scale CCS demonstration projects in Europe underline the issues in eliminating CO2 emissions this century in a cost-effective manner.

The Consultation identified many of the issues faced by CCS project developers and seeks advice on the best policy framework to ensure that the demonstration and further deployment of CCS takes place without further delay.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Carbon capture and storage regulatory review for Trinidad and Tobago
Carbon capture and storage regulatory review for Trinidad and Tobago

30th September 2012

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation, Domestic policy

The carbon capture and storage regulatory review for Trinidad and Tobago considers the existing legal and regulatory framework as it pertains to CCS in Trinidad and Tobago. This review supports a wider grant program funded by the Inter-American Development Bank titled Mainstreaming of Climate Change into National Development and Capacity Building for Participation in Carbon Markets.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Carbon capture and storage regulatory test toolkit
Carbon capture and storage regulatory test toolkit

11th February 2011

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation, Domestic policy

Large point sources of carbon dioxide are responsible for a significant proportion of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions – with fossil fuel power stations and other large-scale industrial activities responsible for around half of the total. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is expected to make a major contribution to reducing these emissions.

Few CCS projects currently exist in the world – and a lack of experience in regulatory agencies and commercial entities of how regulatory systems would apply to such projects increases risk – potentially leading to delays and increased costs for emerging CCS projects.

This toolkit has been produced by Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage (SCCS) researchers on behalf of the Scottish Government and sponsored by the Global CCS Institute. It guides users through a regulatory test exercise, which provides a low-cost, low-risk approach to testing regional and national legislation and regulatory systems for CCS projects, and gaining the benefits in follow-up activities.

The toolkit recommends use of a real or simulated CCS project as part of this exercise to assist government agencies and other stakeholders to work together to test and improve understanding of regulatory systems. It explains how a simulated or real CCS project can be taken through the regulatory process from inception to decommissioning – a test of the regulatory process at much lower cost, time and risk than would be incurred under a real project application.

Implementing this toolkit will assist users to:

  • improve understanding of their local regulatory process
    • the permits and consents necessary for a CCS project
    • the information required
    • the likely timescales for planning and approval
    • the organisations that need to be involved
  • identify gaps, contradictions, and potential revisions to regulatory systems
  • ensure a viable regulatory process is in place for potential CCS projects
  • help to speed up the management of projects to meet demanding timescales for funding; and
  • raise awareness amongst the key stakeholders of their role in the regulatory process

The test exercise seeks to be realistic and to maximise learning opportunities, by involving the actual organisations and people that would be involved in effective handling of a CCS project. The exercise should be led by a government body with the intensive involvement of relevant regulatory agencies. Other stakeholders to involve will include commercial organisations, NGOs, and advisory bodies in the context of regional, national, or cross-jurisdictional project planning.

By working together towards a common vision, and ensuring strong participation and input by key stakeholders, this toolkit will assist users to run a successful regulatory test exercise, identify follow-up actions, and gain the benefits sought.

This exercise will inform government policy and developing CCS regulatory frameworks. Additionally, it should reduce the regulatory risk to CCS project developers – accelerating the consenting process and reducing the burden to all participants involved in that process – as well as ensuring an appropriate balance with other policy objectives.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

CCS ready: issues brief 2010 no. 1
CCS ready: issues brief 2010 no. 1

3rd November 2010

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation, Domestic policy

A new paper defines and explains the intricacies around carbon capture and storage ready (CCS Ready) policy, which helps governments prepare power generators for a shift to a low carbon economy and signals future costs to investors.

The paper highlights growing recognition of CCS as an important CO2 mitigation tool. Some 20 per cent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions can be achieved via the technology, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA).

The paper says that CCS Ready policy needs to be rigorous enough to ensure that retrofit takes place while also being also being open enough to future capture technology advances. Early stage planning for storage is also an important step that underpins what it really means to be CCS Ready, it adds.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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