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Publications, Reports & Research

Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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Learnings from GDF SUEZ Hazelwood carbon capture and utilisation pilot project
Learnings from GDF SUEZ Hazelwood carbon capture and utilisation pilot project

25th February 2016

Topic(s): Engineering and project delivery, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

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The Hazelwood Carbon Capture and Utilisation Pilot Project enabled one of the largest post-combustion carbon capture plants to be installed on a coal-fired power station in Australia. While it is only a pilot scale demonstration plant, this project has strategic significance to the development of carbon capture and storage (CCS) in Australia. Valuable experiences have been achieved through ‘learning by doing’, including funding, management, training, equipment, operation etc. The report endeavours to share those experiences and knowledge.

Knowledge sharing is a key objective of the Global Carbon Capture and Storage Institute (the Institute). A key goal of the Institute is to work with industry partners to share knowledge acquired in the implementation of CCS projects. This report is a collaboration between GDF SUEZ Australian Energy, the operator of the Hazelwood Power Station, and the Institute.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Applying carbon capture and storage to a Chinese steel plant
Applying carbon capture and storage to a Chinese steel plant

27th August 2015

Topic(s): Engineering and project delivery, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

The Global CCS Institute presents a feasibility study report on applying carbon capture and storage (CCS) to a steel plant in China. Toshiba was commissioned to conduct the study through its business partner Tongfang Environment in collaboration with Shougang Jingtang United Iron & Steel of China. The study examined the application of CCS onto the Caofeidian steel plant.

The report covers the concept of capturing CO2 from a Chinese steel plant, transportation and potential storage in an oilfield for enhanced oil recovery (EOR).

The study suggests that carbon capture in Chinese steel plants is a cost effective means of reducing carbon emissions compared with similar plants around the world.

This report is authored by Toshiba for the Global CCS Institute. Tony Zhang, Institute Senior Adviser for Carbon Capture, Asia-Pacific also provides an overview of the report in a new Insight available on the Global CCS Institute website.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

CO2 capture technology selection methodology
CO2 capture technology selection methodology

23rd September 2011

Topic(s): Engineering and project delivery, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

ROAD stands for ‘Rotterdam Opslag en Afvang Demonstratieproject’ (Rotterdam Capture and Storage Demonstration Project) and is one of the largest integrated demonstration projects in the world for the capture and storage of CO2.

In this report, the selection methodology developed by the ROAD project team is described and evaluated, starting with the request for proposal for preliminary studies and ending with the final selection of the capture plant supplier. This report aims to help other CCS projects using post-combustion capture technology to design their own capture plant supplier selection methodology. In a broader sense, it is envisioned that other CCS projects or projects involving novel technologies can learn from the analysis provided in this report.

With respect to the capture supplier selection approach, the most prominent requirement introduced by this funding program was adherence to the challenging project schedule. As the development and construction of the capture plant are on the critical path of the project schedule, the project team had to find a way to select a capture plant supplier within the given time constraints, while still respecting other important constraints, such as cost, technical performance and health, safety and environment (‘HSE’) performance. For this reason, the project team developed a tailor made CO2 capture technology selection methodology.

This report is the first in a series of seven. Other knowledge sharing reports and case studies to be released in the coming months will cover a wide range of topics including: permitting, stakeholder consultation, commercial and funding arrangements, as well as the FEED study for the capture facility for the ROAD project.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Building a consortium to develop a new pulverized coal plant with post-combustion carbon capture
Building a consortium to develop a new pulverized coal plant with post-combustion carbon capture

1st May 2011

Topic(s): Engineering and project delivery, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

The development of a complex project such as the Trailblazer project requires the selection, relationship management and coordination of a diverse consortium, including: developers, equity partners, engineering, procurement and construction contractors, operations and maintenance contractors, fuel suppliers, fuel transporters, water suppliers, power purchaser, carbon dioxide purchaser, Local, State and Federal Governments and lenders. The report discusses the factors considered in Tenaska’s approach to building and managing the consortium required to develop, construct and operate the project.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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