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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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Closing the gap on climate: why CCS is a vital part of the solution
Closing the gap on climate: why CCS is a vital part of the solution

17th December 2015

Organisation(s): ENGO Network on CCS

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Domestic policy, Law and regulation, Policy, Use and storage (CCUS)

The ENGO Network on CCS actively advocates for policies that will lead to the rapid uptake of low carbon technologies and climate change mitigation strategies.

Following the Network's 2012 paper, this work re-examines the role of CCS as a technology traditionally perceived as specific to coal-fired power generation, but whose value is now widely recognised as much broader: in the decarbonisation of power generation fuelled by natural gas, in the industrial sector, and in the increased focus on removing carbon from the atmosphere through bio-CCS.

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炭素回収 貯留の環境非政府組織(ENGO)視点(CCS)
炭素回収 貯留の環境非政府組織(ENGO)視点(CCS)

20th September 2013

Organisation(s): ENGO Network on CCS

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Use and storage (CCUS)

気候変動による危険な影響を回避しうる範囲内に地球の平均気温をとどめるためには、世界のCO2排出量が今後10年以内にピークに達し、2000年レベルに対し今世紀半ばまでに少なくとも50-85%減少する必要がある 。 本章では、CCS展開へのいくつかの主要な動機を考察する。 
第一の理由は、CCSは化石燃料を燃焼する固定汚染源からの排出量削減の手段となるからである。今日、我々が対処せざるを得ない最も重大な排出源は、幅広く普及した化石燃料を消費する多種の事業拠点である。このような事業拠点は多くの将来的経済シナリオにおいてひきつづき増加する見通しであり、政策措置なくしては許容し難いほど多いCO2排出をもたらすこととなる 。 
第二の理由は、複数の技術を組み合わせた展開は経済全体における排出量削減をもたらす可能性を高めるのみならず、全般的な軽減コストの低減をもたらす可能性が高い。気候変動との闘いに必要な排出量削減規模は、いかなる施策もしくは技術であっても、単独では必要とされる規模の削減を達成し得ないことを示している 。 
第三の理由は、現在、いくつかの工業的応用においては、大規模な排出削減を達成できるその他手段があったとしても、その数はごく少ない 。例えば、セメント工業及び製鋼業は、その不可分なプロセスの一部において相当量のCO2を排出する。 
第四の理由は、持続可能なバイオマス燃料を利用する施設からのCO2が回収・貯留されると、大気中のCO2の純減につながるからである。バイオマスは、2010年時点で世界の一次エネルギー総消費量の10%近くを占める重要なエネルギー源である 。 

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Environmental non-government organisation (ENGO) perspectives on carbon capture and storage (CCS)
Environmental non-government organisation (ENGO) perspectives on carbon capture and storage (CCS)

4th December 2012

Organisation(s): ENGO Network on CCS, Global CCS Institute

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Health, safety and environment, Use and storage (CCUS)

In order for global average temperatures to remain within bounds that may avoid the dangerous impacts of climate change, global CO2 emissions would need to peak within the next decade, and decrease at the very least by 50-85 per cent compared to year 2000 levels by mid-century. CCS is an important tool in the fight to reduce global carbon emissions for a range of reasons. This report looks at several core motivations for the deployment of CCS. The first reason is that it offers a pathway to reduce emissions from fossil-fuelled stationary sources. The heaviest carbon legacy that we have to deal with today is the vast installed base of fossil-fuelled industry. This base is projected to grow in most future economic scenarios, and would result in unacceptably high carbon emissions without policy action. A second reason is that the deployment of a portfolio of technologies is not only likely to increase the probability of delivering economy-wide emission reduction outcomes, but is also likely to result in lower overall costs of mitigation. The scale of emission reductions needed to combat climate change means that no single measure or technology is going to be able to deliver those reductions alone on the scale required. A third reason is that for some industrial applications, there are few other ways available today to achieve large emission reductions. The manufacturing of cement and steel, for example, emit significant amounts of CO2 as an integral part of the industrial process. A fourth reason is that when CO2 from facilities that use sustainable biomass is captured and stored, it results in net reductions of CO2 from the atmosphere. Biomass is a considerable energy source accounting for almost 10 per cent of the total global primary energy use as of 2010.

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