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Publications, Reports & Research

Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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CO2パイプライン・インフラストラクチャー
CO2パイプライン・インフラストラクチャー

18th April 2014

Organisation(s): Global CCS Institute, IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEAGHG)

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 transport, Use and storage (CCUS)

本研究の目的は、既存のCO2パイプラインインフラに関する公開情報を総合的なデータベースと参考文献としてとりまとめることにある。特に、CO2パイプラインに特有のトピックと他のガスパイプラインとの相違点を中心的に取り上げている。本書は29のCO2パイプラインプロジェクトに関する詳細な情報を記録したデータベースを補完するものでああり、結果の概要およびこれらのプロジェクトによる全体的な教訓が記載されている。さらに、データベースにある情報一式にアクセスするためのガイドともなっている。

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Comparing different approaches to managing CO2 storage resources in mature CCS futures
Comparing different approaches to managing CO2 storage resources in mature CCS futures

1st March 2014

Organisation(s): British Geological Survey (BGS), Global CCS Institute, IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEAGHG)

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 storage, Use and storage (CCUS)

This study has been funded by the Global Carbon Capture and Storage Institute (GCCSI), through the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEAGHG). The report ‘Comparing different approaches to managing storage resources in mature CCS futures’ summarises the potential for surface and subsurface interactions which might occur during CO2 storage operations. It reviews the regulatory approaches in jurisdictions active in carbon capture and storage (CCS) to managing such interactions and the consequent potential adverse impacts. The authors discuss possible options for managing these interactions to provide timely storage capacity, illustrated with a regional case study from the Southern North Sea.

The report has been written by contributors from US, Australia, Netherlands and Canada, under the lead of the British Geological Survey, United Kingdom.

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CO2 pipeline infrastructure
CO2 pipeline infrastructure

1st January 2014

Organisation(s): Global CCS Institute, IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEAGHG)

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 transport, Use and storage (CCUS)

The aim of this study is to collate information from the public domain on existing CO2 pipelines into a comprehensive reference document. Other objectives are to discuss the similarities and differences between CO2 and other, specifically natural gas, pipelines and to provide an overview. The overall lessons learned from this study should support project developers, decision makers, regulators and governmental bodies who do not deal with engineering calculations and cost estimates on a regular basis.

Based on a wide range of interviews and literature, Ecofys and SNC Lavalin have gathered detailed information on 29 CO2 pipeline projects (out of more than 80 worldwide). This is now accessible as an interactive mapping tool.

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Deployment of CCS in the cement industry
Deployment of CCS in the cement industry

1st December 2013

Organisation(s): Global CCS Institute, IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEAGHG)

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Use and storage (CCUS)

A survey by the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEAGHG) finds that the majority of respondents in the cement industry think that CCS is relevant to them and are aware of research projects, with half involved in CCS activities. The survey and subsequent report were part of the IEAGHG’s research into the cement industry which is one of the largest industrial emitters of greenhouse gas, accounting for around 5% globally.

Sponsored by the Global CCS Institute, this independent report presents important findings to help the industry reduce emissions using CCS. The report establishes a range of techniques to reduce CO2 emissions from cement production along with increased energy efficiency. It finds the preferred techniques for capturing CO2 in cement plants are oxyfuel and post combustion capture. While oxyfuel is in general expected to have a lower energy consumption and costs than post combustion capture using liquid solvent scrubbing, it found disadvantages with pre combustion capture. Finally, the report provides an update on the legal and economic environment for CO2 related policies and regulations facing the industry.

 

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There are more than 100 papers in the public domain on the costs of CCS. However, there are significant differences in the methods employed by various organizations to estimate the cost of CCS systems for fossil fuel power plants. Many of these differences were discussed at a series of workshops, commencing in 2011, through which an international group of experts from industrial firms, government agencies, universities, and environmental organizations met to share information and perspectives on CCS costs for electric power plants.

Such differences often are not readily apparent in publicly reported CCS cost estimates. As a consequence, there is a significant degree of misunderstanding, confusion, and misrepresentation of CCS cost information, especially among audiences not familiar with the details of CCS costing.

A key recommendation of the first workshop was that a task force be formed to develop guidelines and recommendations for a costing method and nomenclature that could be broadly adopted to produce more consistent and transparent cost estimates for CCS applied to electric power plants.

Commencing in late 2011, and Chaired by Ed Rubin, task force members George Booras (EPRI), John Davison (IEAGHG), Clas Ekstrom (Vattenfall), Mike Matuszewski (USDOE/NETL), Sean McCoy (IEA) and Chris Short (Global CCS Institute) prepared a White Paper outlining both differences that exist in many current studies as well as providing guidelines and procedures for CCS costing, encompassing the full chain of CCS.

The aim of the work is not to suggest or recommend a uniform set of assumptions or premises for CCS cost estimates. There are good reasons why the cost of a given technology may vary from one situation to another and from one location to another. Rather, the sole objective is to help all parties with an interest or stake in CCS costing do a better job by addressing the major deficiencies in current costing methods, especially differences in the items included in a cost analysis.

The report addresses six major topics relevant to CCS costs

  • defining project scope and design
  • defining nomenclature and cost categories for CCS cost estimates
  • quantifying elements of CCS cost
  • defining financial structure and economic assumptions
  • calculating the costs of electricity and CO2 avoided
  • guidelines for CCS cost reporting

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CO2 capture at gas fired power plants
CO2 capture at gas fired power plants

19th July 2012

Organisation(s): IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEAGHG)

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 capture, Economics, Use and storage (CCUS)

The purpose of this study is to investigate the technical and economic performance of CO2 capture and compression technologies at new-build gas-fired power plants. The study report provides information on the designs of each of the plants, their power output, efficiency, greenhouse gas intensity, capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, levelised costs of electricity and costs of CO2 avoidance. Process flow diagrams, stream data, equipment lists and plant layout diagrams are also provided.

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Barriers to implementation of CCS: capacity constraints
Barriers to implementation of CCS: capacity constraints

1st July 2012

Organisation(s): IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEAGHG)

Topic(s): Capacity development, Carbon capture, Use and storage (CCUS)

In this study we assess possible supply chain constraints that could arise if CCS is deployed according to the IEA CCS Roadmap. We look at physical constraints (equipment, materials) as well as those in skills and services (human resources). In the context of CCS, capacity generally refers to storage capacity, but storage capacity is not within the scope of the study presented in this report. We focus only on the future capacity of the supply chain for CCS technologies.

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Operating flexibility of power plants with CCS
Operating flexibility of power plants with CCS

1st June 2012

Organisation(s): IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEAGHG)

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Use and storage (CCUS)

The study assesses the flexibility, performance and costs of several examples of power plants with CCS but it is recognised that there are many other potential design options with different degrees of flexibility.

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Gaseous emissions from amine based post combustion CO2 capture processes and their deep removal
Gaseous emissions from amine based post combustion CO2 capture processes and their deep removal

15th May 2012

Organisation(s): IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEAGHG)

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 capture, Use and storage (CCUS)

This report evaluates the emission of MEA and the expected major degradation products and identifies shortcomings of the existing PCC amine technology. The report briefly reviews various compounds expected to be emitted from the process, describes various available emission control methods and then evaluates their suitability for the existing MEA and other amine based PCC technologies.

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Emissions of substances other than CO2 from power plants with CCS
Emissions of substances other than CO2 from power plants with CCS

21st March 2012

Organisation(s): IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEAGHG)

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 capture, Use and storage (CCUS)

This report summarizes the emissions and waste assessment performed by TNO on different power plant configurations with and without carbon capture. CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS) is one of the possible solutions for carbon mitigation in fossil fuel power plants. Before its full demonstration at intermediate scale (by 2015) some aspects of its impact into the environment need to be investigated. IEA GHG has contracted TNO to investigate the effect of CCS on the emissions of substances other than CO2 also emitted by power plants.

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Integration of solar energy technologies with CCS
Integration of solar energy technologies with CCS

1st March 2012

Organisation(s): IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEAGHG)

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Renewables, Solar energy, Use and storage (CCUS)

This internal IEAGHG study was instigated in order to better identify and evaluate the opportunities for CCS and renewable energy technologies to be combined to the mutual benefit of both. The information would also assist in assessing the scope and boundary conditions for a follow on study on CCS life cycle assessment, which would aim to better understand the supply chain impacts and how in the future technology advances may be able to substantially reduce these.

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太陽エネルギー技術のCCSへの適用検討
太陽エネルギー技術のCCSへの適用検討

1st March 2012

Organisation(s): IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEAGHG)

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Renewables, Solar energy, Use and storage (CCUS)

本調査は、CO2回収貯留(CCS)と再生可能エネルギー技術を、相乗効果を高める方法で統合する機会を特定および定量化すること、また再生可能エネルギー発電業界に恒久的な成果を残す可能性のあるあらゆる選択肢を見出すことを目的に実施した。複数の興味深い選択肢が調査され、燃焼後回収CCSにともなうエネルギー損失を補償するために再生可能熱エネルギー活用する事について、詳細なレベルで研究した。
調査した選択肢は以下のとおりである。

  • CCS用溶媒の再生および発電所のその他の熱需要向けの集光型太陽熱エネルギー
  • 集光型太陽熱発電(CSP)のための、エミッションフリーの補助燃料としてのガス化/CCSからの水素
  • ガス化/CCS/水素/CCGT発電所に負荷追従能力を提供する、圧縮空気エネルギー貯蔵(CAES)システム
  • CCS-焼成反応と水素生産を補助する高温化学反応への集光型太陽熱の利用
  • CO2貯留層からの水除去への余剰風力エネルギーの利用

 

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