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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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Developing the public engagement strategy for the Guangdong CCUS Demonstration Program
Developing the public engagement strategy for the Guangdong CCUS Demonstration Program

29th October 2015

Topic(s): Public engagement, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

The Global CCS Institute and the UK-China (Guangdong) CCUS Centre have authored this report to document the process that has been undertaken by the China Resources Power (Haifeng) and China National Offshore Oil Corporation (CNOOC) Integrated Carbon Capture and Sequestration Demonstration Project (CRP Power Project) to develop a public engagement strategy for the project.

This undertaking is the first of its kind in China and is an ongoing journey.To date, the majority of CCS public engagement project case studies have analysed activity that has taken place in Europe, North America and Australia. An important next step is to reflect on how current best practice may apply in other regional contexts. The experiences and lessons learned by the CRP Power Project may be useful to other CCS project proponents in China who are considering the development of a public engagement strategy.

This report is authored by Peta Ashworth (Ash Research), Jessica Morton (Global CCS Institute), Yamin Lin and Si Cao (Nafang Media) and Xi Liang (UK-China (Guangdong) CCUS Centre). The authors would like to acknowledge the strategic advice and input from Qianguo Lin (Global CCS Institute) and Dr David Reiner (Judge Business School, Cambridge University). 

Jessica Morton, the Institute’s Public Engagement Advisor Asia-Pacific has written an Insight that provides an overview of this report and other recent CCS public engagement activities in the Asia Pacific region.

 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

发展公众参与低碳项目的策略
发展公众参与低碳项目的策略

1st September 2015

Topic(s): Public engagement, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

会员专享访问

全球碳捕集与封存研究院和中英(广东)CCUS中心授权该报告介绍了由华润电力(海丰)和中国海洋石油总公司(中海油)一体化碳捕集与封存示范项目(CRP Power Project)实施的项目公众参与战略开发的过程。
此次行动在中国属于首例且是一个持续的过程。到目前为止,CCS公众参与项目案例研究的主要工作是,分析了欧洲、北美和澳大利亚既有的活动。下一步的重点就是仔细考虑目前的最佳实践如何在其他区域环境中得到应用。从CRP Power Project中所学到的经验教训可能对于中国其他考虑公众参与战略发展的CCS项目支持者们很有用。
该报告经由Peta Ashworth(Ash Research)、Jessica Morton(全球碳捕集与封存研究院)、林亚茗和曹斯(南方新闻)和梁希(中英(广东)CCUS中心)授权。授权者们希望感谢林千果(全球碳捕集与封存研究院)和David Reiner博士(剑桥大学贾吉商学院)对本报告的战略性建议和投入。
Jessica Morton,研究院亚太区公众参与高级顾问写了一份观点,对本报告进行了综述并介绍了亚太区近期其他的CCS公众参与活动。

会员专享访问

 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

世界のCCSの動向: 2014
世界のCCSの動向: 2014

4th June 2015

Topic(s): Public engagement, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

我々は、気候変動の緩和に対する最小コストアプローチの一環として、いかにCCSを最適な形で展開できるかについて議論する時期に入っている。当インスティテュートは55件の大規CCSプロジェクトを確認しているが、これらプロジェクトの実現を後押しするための行動が今まさに求められている。

「世界のCCSの動向2014」では、これら開発計画段階にあるCCSプロジェクトの詳細について記載すると共に、プロジェクトの実現を後押しするための行動について検討・分析を行っている。また、将来のCCS展開に関して、CCS開発の対象となる産業と地域の幅を広げつつ次世代のプロジェクトを育てるための基盤作りに必要な活動について検討・分析を行っている。

Japanese translation of The Global Status of CCS: 2014

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

CCS in the Baltic Sea Region – Bastor 2. Work package 3: social aspects for Baltic Sea storage of carbon dioxide
CCS in the Baltic Sea Region – Bastor 2. Work package 3: social aspects for Baltic Sea storage of carbon dioxide

13th April 2015

Topic(s): Public engagement, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) has been highlighted in many countries and regions as a vital measure needed to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions in the fight against climate change. The technical and commercial development has been impeded by projects and project plans facing opposition by different groups. Against this background, this report describes the results of a study, within the BASTOR2 project, analyzing which social factors are likely to influence the plans for a proposed Baltic Sea storage project.

As there are not yet any CO2 storage projects in the Baltic region, the analysis for this report has been carried out on three Swedish case-studies of other energy related projects in the Baltic Sea. The social research literature consistently points to local and regional contexts as having a large influence on the perceptions and acceptance of CCS projects. The report consequently highlights a number of contexts, or conditions, that are identified as important factors in how the case-studies have been perceived and accepted or opposed in the local and national context. 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

サイトの社会的特性分析と 利害関係者の関与
サイトの社会的特性分析と 利害関係者の関与

14th November 2013

Topic(s): Public engagement, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

報告書の背景
一般的な考え方とは違い、社会的受容とは「大多数の市民がプロジェクトを受容すること」を意味するものではない。プロジェクトの社会的受容のレベルは、対象となる集団について、「賛成」または「反対」という行動についての共通のビジョンを用いた調査結果には基づいていない。これは、少数派だろうが受容の条件はそれぞれの利害関係者に特有であるということを無視しているため、民主的な考え方としては不備がある。少数派の反対でプロジェクト全体を阻止するのに十分であるということは繰り返し確認されてきた。

実際のところ、社会的受容とは、プロジェクトの利害関係者が協力して、所定の時間内で、プロジェクトを固有の自然と人間の環境に円滑に統合させるために必要な、最低限の条件を定義するプロセスの結果である。(Caron-Malenfant & Conraud、2009年)。

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

日本における知識共有ネットワークによるCCS コミュニケーション枠組みの構築
日本における知識共有ネットワークによるCCS コミュニケーション枠組みの構築

1st August 2013

Topic(s): Public engagement, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

本報告書は、日本における知識共有ネットワークが実施した複数のフェーズにわたり実施された、「日本における知識共有ネットワークによるCCSコミュニケーション枠組みの構築」プロジェクトの第2 フェーズについて示したものである。実施内容は次のとおりである。

(1). プロジェクトの第1 フェーズで行った、「CCS をコミュニケーションの枠組みを通じてどのように説明すべきか」という専門家の議論に基づき、CO2 回収・貯留(以下「CCS」)に関する一般市民向けアウトリーチプログラムを作成・試験する。

(2). CO2貯留に関する問題のうち、特に、CO2圧入による誘発地震と、地震がCCSに与える影響についての「知識ギャップ」に対処する。

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Communications for carbon capture and storage:  identifying the benefits, managing risk and maintaining the trust of stakeholders
Communications for carbon capture and storage: identifying the benefits, managing risk and maintaining the trust of stakeholders

28th February 2013

Topic(s): Public engagement, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

This report reviews the communication approaches of five CCS projects and explores the common challenges and themes they have faced. It is not designed to be a ‘template for success’ or a ‘how-to’ guide because all projects are different and all sites have specific issues. It does, however, attempt to draw out communication strategies that have proven to be successful for some projects as they have attempted to earn and maintain stakeholders’ trust and suggests measures which, project developers in general and CCS communicators in particular, might adopt if they are to mitigate the risk of failure on the engagement front.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Thematic report: Public engagement session October 2012
Thematic report: Public engagement session October 2012

15th February 2013

Topic(s): Public engagement, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

This report presents the discussions and conclusions reached at a workshop of the European CCS Demonstration Project Network in September 2012 – examining the messaging, tools used and the language used to communicate about CCS. This report seeks to complement and follow on from the report from May 2012 by the same group, which examined the perceived risks and stakeholder profiles that these messages, and messengers, serve and address.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Understanding how individuals perceive carbon dioxide: implications for acceptance of carbon dioxide capture and storage
Understanding how individuals perceive carbon dioxide: implications for acceptance of carbon dioxide capture and storage

1st June 2012

Topic(s): Public engagement, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

Almost all explanations of CCS technology make reference to carbon dioxide (CO2), with an assumption that the general public understands CO2. It has become apparent that the general public’s knowledge and understanding of CO2’s properties influences how they engage with CO2-emitting industries and CCS technologies. However, surprisingly little research has investigated public perceptions, knowledge, and understanding of CO2. This investigation attempts to fill that gap. 

This report describes an investigation of how citizens of three countries — Japan, Australia, and the Netherlands — perceive CO2. Furthermore, it attempts to relate individual perceptions of COto perceptions of CCS, and to determine how information provision about the underlying properties and characteristics of COinfluences individual attitudes towards low-carbon energy options, particularly CCS. 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

International comparison of the large group process: results from Canada, Netherlands, Scotland and Australia
International comparison of the large group process: results from Canada, Netherlands, Scotland and Australia

1st June 2012

Topic(s): Public engagement, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

The research presented in this report presents the results of a large group workshop process, developed in Australia that was replicated across four different countries to engage a cross section of the community. The countries selected were chosen on the basis that carbon capture and storage (CCS), a technology to prevent large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) being released into the atmosphere from the use of fossil fuel in power generation and other industries is being seriously considered as a mitigation option by governments in those countries and included the Netherlands, Scotland, Canada and Australia. 

The main aims of the research were to:

  • explore the views of individuals on climate change and the range of energy technologies;
  • provide background information on climate change and energy technologies; and
  • enable the opportunity for discussion with peers. 

The study assesses the impact of the information and the process on individual knowledge, attitudes and behaviours, and analyses individual views on the potential solutions for mitigation, including CCS, and how these views change as a result of the workshop. 

In total 374 participants attended the workshops. The workshop in the Netherlands was attended by the highest number of participants (n=111), followed by Scotland (n=99), Canada (n=80) and Australia (n=841). 

The results indicated that the workshop was successful in increasing participants' self-rated knowledge about CCS and the portfolio of energy technologies. As in previous research, there was strong support for renewable energy and concerns expressed over any investment in CCS at the expense of renewable energy development. It was also apparent that country context does impact on energy technology preferences. The samples in Australia and Canada – which export a large component of their fossil fuels – were more positive about the role of CCS compared to those in the Netherlands and Scotland. 

The results suggest that the process was successful in gaining citizens' participation and investment in sharing information about energy issues, particularly evidenced by the increase in group identification over the course of the workshop. This seems to indicate, that little was lost by engaging up to 100 people in the room, rather than the normal dozen that would likely participate in a focus group. As such, the process has evident potential to be used to engage larger numbers within a local community about CCS, as it provides a way to access participants’ opinions and allow them to feel that they have been heard. This is in contrast to the more traditional town hall style meeting, where only the loudest voices tend to be acknowledged and can have the greatest influence on the outcome.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Understanding stakeholder attitudes to carbon capture and storage (CCS) in Victoria
Understanding stakeholder attitudes to carbon capture and storage (CCS) in Victoria

1st June 2012

Topic(s): Public engagement, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

This report covers the results of a focus group based research project aimed to understand how residents of the State of Victoria, Australia perceive and accept potential CCS projects. The results demonstrate there is limited awareness of the technology and a need for information and education on CCS. A proportion of the respondents (more than 32%) had questions of a “technical” nature, suggesting that participants sought additional information while considering their acceptance of CCS technology. These questions related to topics including procedures, CO2 properties, CO2 behaviour, impacts, potential for disasters, risks of leaks and aquifer damage and the ability to use existing infrastructure. Participants also raised issues that adopted a broader perspective, such as asking whether CO2 has alternative uses, and what comparisons and evaluations had been carried out to justify the decision to develop CCS compared to other potential climate mitigation technologies. Discussion also encompassed the economic status and prospects of CCS, the connection of CCS to a carbon price, the development of CCS internationally and the interests and institutions supporting CCS.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Deliberating emission reduction options: identifying public perceptions to CCS using the Information Choice Questionnaire methodology
Deliberating emission reduction options: identifying public perceptions to CCS using the Information Choice Questionnaire methodology

1st June 2012

Topic(s): Public engagement, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

The aim of this research was to develop an online decision guide to aid public awareness, knowledge, deliberation and choice around CCS compared with other greenhouse gas mitigation options. The research was an international collaboration between the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Organisation (CSIRO) in Australia and the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN).

The Australian results were similar to those found in the recent Dutch studies. Both countries show a preference for energy efficiency options and renewables, and oppose nuclear energy. Although the consequences of the different options for the Netherlands and Australia were quite different, the overall grades were similar in relative terms. The efficiency options, renewable sources and CCS score sufficient, while nuclear, coal to gas and the international trading scheme score insufficiently. From these results, a number of recommendations are derived for those attempting to improve understanding and perceptions around CCS and other low emissions technologies.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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