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Publications, Reports & Research

Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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Building an industry: updated scenarios for industrial development
Building an industry: updated scenarios for industrial development

1st June 2013

Topic(s): Renewables, Policy, law and regulation

The supply chain supporting renewable infrastructure programmes is a substantial one, and the benefits accruing to UK industry right now are real and significant. This report sets out the size of the opportunity at hand. It shows that the overall scale of ambition in the UK matters, and sets out the views of industry about likely scales of delivery. Importantly, this applies not just to the scale of our offshore programme out to 2020 and whether we see 13GW or 18GW delivered, but what happens across the next decade. For an industry which is making long-term decisions about manufacturing capacity, whether the UK is content with current offshore deployment plans or wants to press ahead at scale further out to 2030 matters greatly.
Irrespective of the scale the supply chain opportunities are considerable, this report also shows that Government needs to take care to play its hand intelligently. We know Government is all too aware that a UK supply chain will not form of its own accord, but will require Government to be an active player and supporter of this market.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Reducing the UK's carbon footprint and managing competitiveness risks
Reducing the UK's carbon footprint and managing competitiveness risks

1st April 2013

Topic(s): Renewables, Policy, law and regulation

This report responds to a request by the Government to look at the role of consumption based emissions. It covers past trends and set out future scenarios for UK consumption emissions. It also considers lifecycle emissions of low-carbon technologies in order to understand how their deployment would impact the UK’s carbon footprint.
In providing this advice, this report address the related issue as to whether offshoring of industry in response to low-carbon policies has been or could be a significant contributory factor to reductions in production emissions. This would not have any benefits for the UK’s carbon footprint and therefore global emission reductions, and would not be desirable from a wider economic perspective.

It is important that these competitiveness risks are assessed and managed when designing approaches to reduce emissions. This is clear in the Climate Change Act, which requires us to consider international circumstances and competitiveness impacts when advising on carbon budgets.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Evaluating policies in support of the deployment of renewable power
Evaluating policies in support of the deployment of renewable power

1st January 2012

Topic(s): Renewables, Policy, law and regulation

This brief summarises common criteria and indicators that policy-makers can use to conduct evaluations of renewable power deployment policies. Five commonly assessed criteria are: effectiveness; efficiency; equity; institutional feasibility; and replicability. Under each criterion, it is important to establish measurable indicators that can be used to assess performance. This brief only looks at policy performance with respect to deployment, and not at the broader impacts of renewable energy technologies, such as environmental economic, energy security or technological impacts.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Is the fit right? Considering technological maturity in designing renewable energy policy
Is the fit right? Considering technological maturity in designing renewable energy policy

1st June 2011

Topic(s): Renewables, Policy, law and regulation

Recent studies suggest that the United States can greatly expand its deployment of renewable energy resources beyond current levels. This would reduce emissions of harmful pollutants and enhance energy security by diversifying the nation’s domestic energy supply. This brief describes a number of policy tools that can be employed to drive investment in renewable energy technologies and discusses which policy options may be the best fit based on the commercial maturity of a targeted technology.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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