Filter by

Date +
Topic +
Organisation +

[ Clear Filtering ]

Publications, Reports & Research

Resources

Publications, Reports & Research

Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

Filter by

[ Clear Filtering ]

The social cost of CO2 from the PAGE09 model
The social cost of CO2 from the PAGE09 model

15th September 2011

Organisation(s): The Kiel Institute for the World Economy, University of Cambridge

Topic(s): Economics, Social cost

A new version of the PAGE integrated assessment model, PAGE09, is introduced. The most important scientific, impact, emission and adaptation inputs in the latest default version of the model, PAGE09 v1.7 are described. The scientific and economic impact results are presented for a business as usual (BAU) emissions scenario, and for a low emissions scenario which aims to have a 50% chance of keeping the rise in global mean temperatures below 2 degC. Today’s mean social cost of CO2 is about $100 per tonne of CO2 in the BAU scenario, and about $50 per tonne in the low emissions scenario. The major influences on the SCCO2 are found to be the transient climate response, the pure time preference rate, the elasticity of the marginal utility of consumption, the feedback response time of the earth and the weight on non‐economic impacts. Less than 10% of the mean SCCO2 comes from impacts in annex 1 from annex 1 emissions, while over 45% comes from impacts in the rest of the world (RoW) from RoW emissions. About one third of the mean SCCO2 comes from impacts in the RoW caused by emissions in annex 1, while just over 10% comes from impacts in annex 1 caused by emissions in the RoW.

Download

Evaluating global carbon capture and storage (CCS) communication materials: a survey of global CCS communications
Evaluating global carbon capture and storage (CCS) communication materials: a survey of global CCS communications

21st June 2011

Organisation(s): Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Global CCS Institute, University of Cambridge

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Communication, Public engagement, Use and storage (CCUS)

CCS communications are likely to play a crucial part in determining what kind of role CCS eventually ends up playing in the energy and climate infrastructures currently being planned and built around the world. With CCS not yet operating on a commercial scale, CCS communications via media coverage, visits to science museums, and especially websites, make up a significant part of the ‘CCS’ that most people will experience. As Hammond and Shackley (2010) point out, the images and presentation of CCS, more than actual CCS infrastructure or experiences with CCS, make up what CCS means to most people at the present time. The importance therefore of questions about how CCS is being communicated becomes imperative, specifically, how such communication is, and may be, developing and where it might be enhanced and improved in the future.

This report reviews the scope and key characteristics of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) communications and primarily builds upon a comprehensive Global CCS Communications Database that was compiled for this project. The report also draws upon investigations of non-web sources, including books, articles, media reporting of CCS, educational materials and museum exhibits, to provide as varied and comprehensive an overview as possible of CCS communication practices to date.

The headline findings are:

  1. Overall, progress is slow and sporadic but gradually building in scale and scope.
  2. The focus is still on how CCS works, rather than how it might be made to work and the overall benefits.
  3. Transport is the ‘invisible’ technology.
  4. There is a heavy reliance on climate change as the sole rationale justifying CCS.
  5. A large majority of CCS communications material is overtly positive.
  6. Communications by research institutions are usually narrowly technical, but more critical sources tend to focus on a wider set of issues, especially social concerns.
  7. The Internet remains the focus for CCS communication.
  8. English remains the primary language of CCS communication.
  9. The ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach limits potential usefulness to many groups.
  10. Educational materials are being developed but only slowly.

Download

Newsletter

Get the latest CCS updates