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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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The Global Status of CCS: 2014 Summary Report
The Global Status of CCS: 2014 Summary Report

5th November 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 capture, CO2 storage, CO2 transport, CO2 utilisation, Use and storage (CCUS)

The Global Status of CCS: 2014 Summary Report provides an executive overview of the key findings and recommendations contained in the Institute’s Global Status of CCS: 2014 report.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

The Global Status of CCS: 2014
The Global Status of CCS: 2014

5th November 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 capture, CO2 storage, CO2 transport, CO2 utilisation, Use and storage (CCUS)

The Global CCS Institute is pleased to announce the release of our Global Status of CCS: 2014 report.

The report provides a detailed overview of the current status of large-scale CCS projects worldwide, finding that 2014 has been a pivotal year for CCS, which is now a reality in the power industry.

For the first time, the report introduces and provides links to project descriptions for around 40 lesser scale ‘notable’ CCS projects. The 2014 report focuses on a number of ‘notable’ projects in Japan.

The Global Status of CCS: 2014 report provides a comprehensive overview of global and regional developments in CCS and what is required to support global climate mitigation efforts. Providing a number of key recommendations for decision makers, The Global Status of CCS: 2014 report is an important reference guide for industry, government, research bodies and the broader community.

Supplementary Information Presentation Package

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Global CCS Institute annual review 2014
Global CCS Institute annual review 2014

31st October 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Use and storage (CCUS)

This Annual Review covers the Institute’s work achievements for July 2013 - June 2014. Showcasing global and regional achievements, it highlights the Institute’s work in progressing three key objectives:

  • authoritative knowledge sharing
  • fact-based, influential advice and advocacy, and
  • creation of favourable conditions to implement CCS.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Lessons from project level community engagement
Lessons from project level community engagement

23rd October 2014

Topic(s): Public engagement, Social research, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

The South West Hub Carbon Capture and Storage Project team, led by the Western Australian Department of Mines and Petroleum (DMP) is committed to an open process of community involvement during all stages of the project. The project team host regular community information sessions and make regular appearances at local agricultural shows. In October 2014 the project team released this report, ‘Lessons from Project Level Community Engagement’ that discusses the impacts and effects of the public engagement program undertaken by DMP.

This report is written by Peta Ashworth, Ash Research, for ANLEC R&D.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Report on CSLF Task Force 6 on reviewing best practices and standards for geologic storage and monitoring of CO2
Report on CSLF Task Force 6 on reviewing best practices and standards for geologic storage and monitoring of CO2

10th October 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

This presentation is intended for those who want a quick look at available standards, guidelines and best practice manuals to safe and efficient storage of CO2. It is based on the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum report Reviewing Best Practices and Standards for Geologic Storage and Monitoring of CO2, an Initial Compilation of Standards, Best Practices and Guidelines for CO2 Storage and Monitoring.

This content has been incorporated into openCCS: Storage, the handbook for delivering carbon capture storage (CCS) projects brought to you by the Global CCS Institute.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Geochemical and geomechanical testing of near wellbore CO2 injectivity improvement
Geochemical and geomechanical testing of near wellbore CO2 injectivity improvement

1st October 2014

Topic(s): CO2 storage

Geochemical and geomechanical testing of near wellbore CO2 injectivity improvement project encompassed three key parts, discussed in this report, aimed at supporting Australian CO2 geosequestration field demonstration and commercial projects.

Lab experiments were conducted on archived and fresh cores from the target formations of the Wandoan CCS project in the Surat Basin, Queensland and Berea Sandstone supplied by ANLEC R&D for the purpose of benchmarking of permeability results across related ANLEC R&D projects.

Geomechanical tests provided the basis for stress/permeability relationships.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Legal liability and carbon capture and storage: a comparative perspective
Legal liability and carbon capture and storage: a comparative perspective

1st October 2014

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 storage, Law and regulation, Liability, Policy, Use and storage (CCUS)

Legal liability issues remain critically important for the commercial development of carbon capture and storage (CCS). This co-authored report by Global CCS Institute and University College London largely focusses on the storage aspect of the CCS process. Storage is where the most distinctive liability challenges lie, largely due to the long time-scales involved.

The authors address three types of legal liability:

  1. Civil liability where third parties who have suffered harm seek compensation or a court order.
  2. Administrative liability where authorities are given powers to serve some form of enforcement or clean-up order.
  3. Emissions trading liability where an emissions trading regime provides a benefit for CO2 storage and an accounting mechanism is in place should there be subsequent leakage.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

REthinking energy: towards a new power system
REthinking energy: towards a new power system

28th September 2014

Topic(s): Renewables, Project financing

IRENA’s Rethinking Energy series explores the changes that are transforming the way energy is produced and used, and how this affects governments, businesses and individual citizens.

The first edition of REthinking Energy focuses on the power sector. It describes the trends driving this change, how the technology is evolving, who is financing it, and the wider benefits it will bring. Finally, it examines what an energy system powered by renewables might look like and how policy makers can further support the transformation.

 

 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Pathways to deep decarbonisation in 2050: how Australia can prosper in a low carbon world. Technical report
Pathways to deep decarbonisation in 2050: how Australia can prosper in a low carbon world. Technical report

23rd September 2014

Topic(s): Energy efficiency, Renewables, Economics, Fuel switching, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Nuclear energy

This report presents the technical analysis supporting ClimateWorks’ Pathways to Deep Decarbonisation in 2050: How Australia Can Prosper in a Low Carbon World. It provides readers with details on assumptions, data, and modelling tools. This Technical Report provides detailed results and a discussion of limitations.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Pathways to deep decarbonisation in 2050: how Australia can prosper in a low carbon world
Pathways to deep decarbonisation in 2050: how Australia can prosper in a low carbon world

23rd September 2014

Topic(s): Energy efficiency, Renewables, Economics, Fuel switching, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Nuclear energy

Pathways to Deep Decarbonisation in 2050: How Australia Can Prosper in a Low Carbon World presents an illustrative deep decarbonisation pathway for Australia - just one of many possible pathways - developed using a combination of well-established modelling tools to identify feasible and least-cost options. The frame of reference for the analysis is that all countries decarbonise by 2050, consistent with the objective of limiting the increase in global mean surface temperature to 2°C in order to avoid dangerous climate change.

This initial project report shows that Australia can achieve net zero emissions by 2050 and live within its recommended carbon budget, using technologies that exist today (including carbon capture and storage), while maintaining economic prosperity. Major technological transitions are needed in some industries and many activities, but no fundamental change to Australia’s economy is required. Economic activity and Australian incomes keep rising. The economy grows by 150% to 2050, while net emissions fall to zero and energy sector emissions are reduced by more than four fifths.

This report is accompanied by the Technical Report which gives detail on assumptions, data, modelling tools and detailed results.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Pathways to deep decarbonization: 2014 report
Pathways to deep decarbonization: 2014 report

19th September 2014

Topic(s): Energy efficiency, Renewables, Economics, Fuel switching, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Nuclear energy

This 2014 report by the Deep Decarbonization Pathway Project (DDPP) summarises preliminary findings of the technical pathways developed by the DDPP Country Research Partners with the objective of achieving emission reductions consistent with limiting global warming to less than 2°C., without, at this stage, consideration of economic and social costs and benefits.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

ADB Technical Assistance Project: Aspen simulation and evaluation of economic feasibility of CO2 capture for Gaojing gas fired power plant
ADB Technical Assistance Project: Aspen simulation and evaluation of economic feasibility of CO2 capture for Gaojing gas fired power plant

1st September 2014

Topic(s): Economics, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

This research project is an extension of the ADB-PRC joint initiative, Study on Carbon Capture and Storage in Natural Gas-Based Power Plants (TA-8001-PRC). What follows is a bottom-up economic assessment of the proposed Gaojing combined heat and power (CHP) CCS plant that:

  • Evaluates CO2 capture energy consumption in different scenarios and optimize that consumption
  • Makes an economic feasibility evaluation of Gaojing CHP’s CO2 capture retrofitting
  • Evaluates the advantages of meeting capture-ready criteria in subsequent CCS implementation
  • Recommends the capture-ready conditions for Gaojing CHP at different carbon capture rates

 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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