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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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From EOR to CCS: The evolving legal and regulatory framework for carbon capture and storage
From EOR to CCS: The evolving legal and regulatory framework for carbon capture and storage

1st January 2008

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

Carbon capture and storage has been proposed around the world as a potentially key technology for reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The United States oil and gas industry has a long experience in transporting, injecting, and effectively storing CO2 in tertiary oil recovery operations usually known as Enhanced Oil Recovery. As a result, there already exists a legal and regulatory framework that addresses many – but not all – of the issues that will need to be addressed if carbon capture and storage is to be adopted by policymakers as part of a carbon regulation regime. A review of that existing framework allows identification of those aspects that appear adequate to govern the sale, transport, and injection of CO2 for carbon capture and storage purposes as well as those that do not. Building on this analysis, the authors conclude that the current legal framework will be largely adequate from a transactional and interim standpoint to allow parties to structure a relatively seamless transition from CO2 storage that is an incidental result of oil production operations to those incremental injections of CO2 intended solely for permanent underground storage. The authors also suggest some possible approaches for crafting new rules to fill potentially remaining legal or regulatory gaps.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Low carbon energy: A roadmap
Low carbon energy: A roadmap

1st January 2008

Topic(s): Energy efficiency, Renewables

This report assess the available technology for power generation from renewables and efficiency increases leads the author to conclude that a low-carbon future lies just round the corner.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Regulation of carbon capture and storage
Regulation of carbon capture and storage

1st January 2008

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

This policy brief concentrates on a key institutional barrier: the defi cit of regulatory frameworks for capture and storage of CO2. It builds upon IRGC commissioned papers and a workshop involving eleven international teams which was held in Washington DC in March 20071 and from comments and presentations made during a conference held in November 2007 at the Swiss Re Centre for Global Dialogue, Rüschlikon, Switzerland.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

The social cost of carbon: valuation estimates and their use in UK policy
The social cost of carbon: valuation estimates and their use in UK policy

1st January 2008

Topic(s): Economics, Social cost

There is an increasing interest in the economics of climate change, and the marginal damage costs of emissions, known as the Social Cost of Carbon (SCC). In 2002, the UK Government recommended an SCC for policy appraisal. A recent review of this SCC was commissioned and summarised in this paper. The authors conclude that SCC estimates span at least three orders of magnitude, reflecting uncertainties in climate change and choices of key parameters/variables (discount rate, equity weighting and risk aversion). Estimates also vary due to their coverage, and a risk matrix was developed to compare climate change effects (predictable to major events) against impacts (market, non-market and socially contingent). From several lines of evidence, the current lower SCC value is considered a reasonable lower benchmark for a global decision committed to reducing the threat of dangerous climate change. An upper benchmark was more difficult to deduce, though the risk of high values was considered significant. It is currently impossible to provide a central value with confidence. The study also reviewed the use of the SCC in policy, from project appraisal to long-term climate policy, and used stakeholder interviews to elicit views. A wide diversity of responses was found: whilst most considered some values are needed for policy appraisal, nearly all had reservations for long-term policy. From this, the authors propose a two tier approach. The economic benefits of climate change should be considered when setting long-term policy, but a wider framework is needed (i.e. than cost-benefit analysis). This should include a disaggregated analysis of economic winners and losers by region and sector, and key impact indicators such as health and ecosystems. It should also consider the full risk matrix (i.e. non-marginal/irreversible effects). Once long-term policy is set, shadow prices for appraisal across Government are useful, provided they are consistent with the long-term goal, and are applied consistently.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

The In Salah Gas CO2 Storage Project
The In Salah Gas CO2 Storage Project

1st December 2007

Topic(s): Engineering and project delivery, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

This paper provides an overview of the In Salah Gas CO2 Storage Project, based in the Ahnet-Timimoun Basin in the Algerian Central Sahara. The project was established as a public demonstration of storage assurance, to capture and reinject waste CO2 from natural gas production, that would have otherwise been vented to the atmosphere. This is a Joint Industry Project (JIP) with participation from industry, academia, government and non-government organisations.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Carbon capture and storage projects under the climate policy regime: The case of Halten CO2
Carbon capture and storage projects under the climate policy regime: The case of Halten CO2

1st December 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

The aim of this study is to assess institutional, political and legislative issues associated with the planned “CO2 value chain from Tjeldbergodden to Draugen and Heidrun” industrial project. The Draugen and Heidrun oil reservoirs are two important components of the value chain and are situated on the Halten Bank off mid-Norway. For short we refer to the project as the “Halten CO2 project”. This study is supplemented by an economic study and a study of legislative issues. The economic study is carried out by CICERO and focuses on the social value of the Tjeldbergodden industrial project. The legislative study focuses on environmental liability, discusses the relevant Norwegian legislation, and point out which adjustments Norwegian authorities should consider before CO2 chains become operative in Norway. It is carried out by the Scandinavian Institute of Marine Law at University of Oslo (Berger, 2007a and 2007b).

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Carbon capture and storage in the CDM
Carbon capture and storage in the CDM

1st December 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

The possible inclusion of CCS projects under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) raises a number of issues, including how to deal with potential leaks of CO2 and associated permanence and liability issues, what an appropriate project boundary is, how to deal with CDM-“leakage” (i.e. emissions resulting from the project activity beyond its boundaries) and what the possible impact of including CCS would be on the broad CDM  portfolio. This paper assesses these issues.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Development of a CO2 transport and storage network in the North Sea: report to the North Sea Basin Task Force
Development of a CO2 transport and storage network in the North Sea: report to the North Sea Basin Task Force

6th November 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage, CO2 transport

The UK and Norwegian governments engaged Element Energy Limited, Pöyry Energy, and the British Geological Survey to examine the role that a pipeline infrastructure for carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) could play in reducing CO2 emissions from both countries. 

This report, commissioned by the UK Department of Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (formerly the Department of Trade and Industry) on behalf of the UK, Norway and North Sea Basin Task Force, examines possible development pathways for a CCS pipeline infrastructure connecting large UK and Norwegian sources with appropriate sinks in the North Sea and describes the implications for both countries.

 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Carbon dioxide capture from existing coal-fired power plants
Carbon dioxide capture from existing coal-fired power plants

1st November 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

This study was performed to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of various levels of CO2 capture (e.g., 90%, 70%, 50%, and 30%) for retrofitting an existing pulverized coal-fired power plant (Conesville #5 unit in Ohio, United States) using advanced amine-based capture technology.  

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Carbon capture and storage at Mongstad
Carbon capture and storage at Mongstad

1st August 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

This project, the importance of which the government compared to landing on the moon, has been heavily debated in recent months. Removing and storing the carbon dioxide (CO2) from gas-fired power plants represents a much cleaner way to produce electricity and make use of fossil fuels. This is a new and costly technology. There is a lot of uncertainty associated with these costs, and as it turns out – the Mongstad project will not be in the lower range of these costs.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Expert workshop on financing carbon capture and storage: Barriers and solutions
Expert workshop on financing carbon capture and storage: Barriers and solutions

1st July 2007

Topic(s): Economics, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

The CCS Expert Meeting on Finance took place over two days in London.  The Meeting was by invitation only and limited to 80 people that included representatives from Governments, industry, the financial sector academia and research organizations.

The main purpose of the conference was to provide a clearer picture of the options  available to finance CCS projects and to increase the involvement of experts from the financial sector and to discuss financial instruments with industry and Government representatives.  The ultimate outcome of this work will be to identify, encourage and develop world-wide collaboration and practical development of financial mechanisms to accelerate the progression of CCS projects from R&D to commercial reality.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Carbon dioxide capture and geological sequestration potential of the APEC region (phase III): final report
Carbon dioxide capture and geological sequestration potential of the APEC region (phase III): final report

26th June 2007

Topic(s): Economics, Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

The purpose of this project (phase III) was to increase the capacity, expand the knowledge and awareness of APEC economies (China and Mexico) to assess the potential of CCS technologies within their own economies, evaluate the options and implement successful CCS initiatives.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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