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£26 million awarded to accelerate rollout of carbon capture and storage in the UK
£26 million awarded to accelerate rollout of carbon capture and storage in the UK

27th June 2019

The Global CCS Institute welcomes the UK Government funding announcement supporting carbon capture, utilisation and storage.  Welcoming today's announcement, Guloren Turan, General-Manager, Advocacy at the Global CCS Institute said:

“This announcement is a step forward in supporting carbon capture, utilisation and storage and driving these technologies forward. It also shows the versatility and the potential for the selected innovative projects to support the UK’s ambition in reaching net-zero. Some of these projects will enable the production of low carbon hydrogen and support industrial decarbonisation . There is an increased momentum for CCS in the UK and also in Europe. The UK has been playing a leading role in advocating for CCS. Now it’s important to continue efforts to build a supportive policy framework and political support that will allow projects to come online and enable the development of necessary infrastructure.”


The following press release was initially published on the UK Government website here.

  • £26 million awarded to accelerate rollout of carbon capture and storage as UK moves to a net zero emissions economy
  • 40,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide – 100 times more than the UK’s current largest facility – to be captured each year at Tata Chemicals Europe in Cheshire
  • emissions reduction is equivalent to 22,000 fewer cars on the road

The UK’s largest carbon capture project to date, removing 40,000 tonnes of CO2 from the atmosphere each year, could be up and running by as soon as 2021 thanks to government backing.

9 companies have secured £26 million of government funding, in addition to industry backing, to advance the rollout of carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS) in the UK - a crucial step towards the UK’s net zero emissions and the end of the UK’s contribution to global warming. It is the next milestone for the government’s ambition for the UK to be a world-leader in the field as laid out in the Clean Growth Strategy and last November’s CCUSAction Plan.

Today’s awards will be announced by Energy and Clean Growth Minister Chris Skidmore on a visit to Tata Chemicals Europe’s plant in Winnington, Cheshire. The plant, which is the UK’s only manufacturer of soda ash and sodium bicarbonate, is being awarded £4.2 million toward the construction of a facility to capture and utilise 40,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide a year – the equivalent of 22,000 cars.

When fully operational in 2021 it will be the largest carbon capture plant in the UK, removing 100 times more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere than the country’s current largest facility.

Energy and Clean Growth Minister Chris Skidmore said:

Carbon capture, utilisation and storage has an essential role to play in our efforts to tackle climate change, helping us to meet our ambition to end our contribution to global warming entirely by 2050.

If we are to become a net zero emissions economy and end our contribution towards global warming, then innovative schemes like Tata Chemicals’ will be essential. Their plans demonstrate the enormous potential that CCUS has, reducing our emissions and helping companies to innovate and export products all around the world.

The funding the government is awarding today puts the UK at the forefront of the rollout of this technology and demonstrates how our Clean Growth Strategy is delivering for all parts of the country.

8 more projects are being awarded between £170,000 and £7 million as part of 2 programmes – the £20 million Carbon Capture and Utilisation programme (CCUD) and the £24 million Call for CCUS Innovation programme.

Energy-intensive industries currently produce approximately 24% of global emissions. This potentially vital technology captures carbon from power stations and carbon heavy industries such as cement, chemicals, steel, and oil refining. Then, before it even enters the air, it can either be used for industrial purposes like manufacturing concrete or can be stored safely underground, reducing pollution and helping to tackle climate change.

Last November the government released its Carbon Capture Usage and Storage Deployment Pathway, setting out the next steps government and industry should take in partnership in order to achieve the government’s ambition of having the option to deploy CCUS at scale during the 2030s, subject to costs coming down sufficiently.

Today’s announcement also builds on the government’s commitment for the first net-zero carbon cluster of industry by 2040 backed by up to £170 million funding to cut emissions.

The full list of projects which have secured funding is as follows:

Carbon Capture, Usage and Demonstration (CCUD)

The CCUD programme is designed to encourage industrial sites to capture carbon dioxide of up to 70,000 tonnes per year, which could then be used commercially in industrial applications. £20 million has been made available, of which nearly £5 million is being awarded today. It is intended to demonstrate how such projects can be replicated in the UK and Europe to deploy a pipeline of CCU projects for wide-scale deployment in the 2030s.

  • Drax – Fuel Cell Biogenic Carbon Capture Demonstration, £500,000 towards a £1 million project
  • Origen Power – Oxy-Fuelled Flash Calciner Project, £249,000 towards a £356,000 project
  • Tata Chemicals Europe – Carbon Capture and Utilisation Demonstration,£4.2 million towards a £17 million project

Call for CCUS Innovation

In July 2018 a £15 million Call for CCUS innovation was announced to offer grant funding to projects which would reduce the cost or accelerate the rollout of CCUS in the UK and internationally. Following a review in January 2019 the amount of funding being made available was increased to £24 million.

  • C-Capture – Negative CO2 emissions from BECCS, £4,915,070 towards an £11.1 million project
  • Pale Blue Dot Energy – Acorn storage site, £4,795,017 towards an £8.1 million project
  • TiGRE Technologies Limited - Integration of CCUS technology to a 200MW OCGT TiGRE Project located in the North Sea, £163,909 towards a £243,000 project
  • Translational Energy Research Centre (PACT-2) - Led by University of Sheffield / Pilot-Scale Advanced Capture Technology (PACT), £7 million toward a £21 million project
  • Progressive Energy – HyNet Industrial CCS, £494,626 toward a £765,500 project
  • OGCI Climate Investments – Clean Gas Project, £3.8 million toward an £18 million project

Timeline

  • October 2017 – government launches its Clean Growth Strategy, committing the UK to showing international leadership in carbon capture by collaborating with our global partners and investing up to £100 million in leading edge CCUS and industrial innovation to drive down costs.
  • July 2018 – £15 million Call for CCUS Innovation announced to bring down the cost and accelerate the rollout of carbon capture in the UK
  • November 2018 – £315 million Industrial Energy Transformation Fund announced in the autumn budget, helping businesses with high energy use to cut their bills and transition to a low carbon future through technologies such as carbon capture and storage.
  • November 2018 – launch of the CCUS Action Plan, setting out the next steps towards the government’s ambition to deploy CCUS at scale during the 2030s
  • January 2019 – the amounting of funding being made available in the Call for CCUS Innovation was increased from £15 million to £24 million
Institute welcomes Energy Council conclusions
Institute welcomes Energy Council conclusions

26th June 2019

The Global CCS Institute welcomes the adopted Council conclusions on the future of energy systems in the Energy Union. Today’s conclusions are another positive sign recognising the role of carbon capture and storage (CCS) in delivering Europe’s climate ambition and supporting the decarbonisation of energy-intensive industries. As highlighted in the adopted conclusions, carbon capture and storage is part of a portfolio of climate solutions that will enable Europe to meet its climate targets. As Member States work to finalise their National Energy and Climate Plans, it is important time to build a supportive policy environment and  support the development of common CO2 transport and storage infrastructure.

Read the adopted conclusions here.

G20 Ministerial highlights the importance of carbon capture, utilisation and storage technologies
G20 Ministerial highlights the importance of carbon capture, utilisation and storage technologies

18th June 2019 - Japan, Tokyo

Tokyo, Tuesday 18 June 2019: A historic meeting of G20 nations’ environment and energy ministers in Karuizawa, Japan during the weekend has focused attention on carbon capture, utilisation and storage as important, innovative technologies for the global energy transition.

The meeting, to discuss energy transitions and global environment for sustainable growth, resulted in a communique stating the challenges in addressing key global issues, such as climate change, were “complex” and “urgent”.

The communique also detailed the adoption of the ‘G20 Karuizawa Innovation Action Plan on Energy Transitions and Global Environment for Sustainable Growth’, aiming to reinforce and enhance a variety of initiatives across the nations, involving multiple stakeholders.

In adopting the plan, the G20 countries will encourage the development and deployment of a range of innovative technologies and approaches, including carbon, capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS).

CEO of the Global CCS Institute, Mr Brad Page, welcomed the inclusion of CCUS technologies within the action plan, saying:

“Carbon capture, utilisation and storage technologies are an essential inclusion in any global strategy to address climate change, and to reach the net-zero emissions by mid-century target outlined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

“I congratulate the Government of Japan, as G20 hosts, for leading these important discussions, and for the G20 nations for their inclusion of CCUS within the resulting environmental and energy action plan.

“CCUS technology not only has the ability to achieve deep emissions reductions and mitigate global warming, but has capacity to deliver energy security, economic growth and sustainable development”, said Mr Page.

The plan also highlighted the important role of G20 nations in “supporting the private sector in the promotion of innovation, investment and a better business environment to develop and deploy affordable, reliable, sustainable and low GHG emissions energy systems” and stated that governments will continue to play a key role in creating an enabling environment for innovation.

Japan will host the G20 Summit in Osaka on 29-30 June.

Ends

Lucy Temple-Smith (Melbourne): +61 466 982 068 lucy.temple-smith@globalccsinstitute.com

UK’s pledge to net-zero target will require progress on carbon capture and storage
UK’s pledge to net-zero target will require progress on carbon capture and storage

12th June 2019

The Global CCS Institute welcomes the UK Government’s announcement to introduce legislation to reach a net-zero target by 2050.  This is a historic moment for climate protection efforts as the UK becomes the first G7 economy to commit to this ambitious climate target. In light of this announcement, the 2008 Climate Change Act will be amended to include the new legally binding target.

The UK’s increased climate ambition will require a portfolio of climate measures, solutions and technologies. In its Clean Growth Strategy, the UK recognised the crucial role of carbon capture and storage (CCS) in delivering its climate goals. The set of technologies can support the rapid decarbonisation of the UK economy, this while fostering economic growth opportunities.  Recently, the  UK Committee on Climate Change also recognised that a net-zero target will require important contributions from CCS in industry, for hydrogen production, combined with bioenergy (e.g. for power generation) and in flexible fossil-fired power generation, with up to 75-175 MtCO₂ captured and stored annually by 2050.

Welcoming the announcement, Guloren Turan, General-Manager, Advocacy and Communications at the Global CCS Institute, said: “The UK has a unique opportunity to lead on global climate efforts and be an early mover on CCS technologies.  The Government has set the ambition to deliver CCS at scale during the 2030s. Today’s announcement is an important step forward and creates a predictable path for  future climate policy. It is now essential to create the right framework and policies to drive the deployment innovative technologies like carbon capture and storage which have an important role to play in delivering these ambitious targets.”

There are currently six CCS facilities in development in the UK. These include Acorn CCS, Caledonia Clean Energy, HyNet North West, H21 North of England, Teesside Collective, and BECCS pilot plant at Drax Power Station. Several of these facilities also include hydrogen production.

More information about the UK Government’s approach to CCS here.

 

 

Carbon capture and storage: a key technology for a decarbonised future
Carbon capture and storage: a key technology for a decarbonised future

10th June 2019

Singapore Friday 7 June 2019: Representatives from industry, government, academia and the private sector from across Asia and the globe heard of the vital climate change technology carbon capture and storage (CCS) and its potential to decarbonise emissions intense nations last week.

The message was delivered as part of the Innovate4Climate Conference in Singapore, at a workshop hosted by international think tank the Global CCS Institute whose mission it is to accelerate the deployment of carbon capture and storage.

Speakers from Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University, India’s Dalmia Cement, Japan’s Ministry of Environment, Trade and Industry, and the Global CCS Institute told over 60 attendees of the development and potential of CCS technology in delivering deep emissions reductions; in particular in hard to abate industrial sectors – including cement, steel, fertisler and, petrochemicals – that account for just over 20 per cent of global emissions.

Making introductory comments, Dr Tony Zhang, Senior Client Engagement Lead from the Global CCS Institute said:

“CCS is a suite of safe and proven climate change mitigation technologies that prevents large quantities of CO2 from being released into the atmosphere. CCS is internationally recognised by specialist climate change bodies, such as the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the International Energy Agency (IEA), as vital to achieving global climate targets under the Paris agreement.

“CCS is an essential clean technology not only because of its ability to achieve deep emissions reductions and mitigate global warming, but also because of its capacity to deliver energy security, economic growth and sustainable development”, said Dr Zhang.

The essential application of CCS as a low-carbon technology in large industrial sectors was demonstrated by Mr Ashwani Pahuja, Chief Sustainability & Finance Officer for India’s Dalmia Cement.

“For the decarbonisation of the cement industry in India, the only solution is carbon capture and utilisation (CCU) and we believe our carbon emissions can not only be captured but also utilised effectively”.

“As a climate forward organisation, we want to be part of the solution, and we must be a leader in the field of CCU to move the technology forward”, said Mr Pahuja.

Mr Yoshihiro Kawaguchi from Japan’s Ministry of Environment, Trade and Industry (METI) spoke of the significance of CCS as an emissions reduction technology, and the important role governments can play with supportive policy.

Mr Kawaguchi noted that as CCS deployment increases, costs will come down. He said there is also an increased opportunity for Japan, and all countries, to collaborate on the improvements to technology and progression of CCS globally.

Dr Paul Liu, Assistant Professor at the School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University in Singapore said even with the progress of renewables, CCS remains an essential decarbonisation technology whilst also highlighting its key role in emissions intense industrial processes.

Dr Liu also addressed the question CCS cost, saying there is huge scope to bring costs down through industrial experience and improving energy efficiency processes.

“A lot of work is currently being done on CCS research and development that will result in driving costs down. Many key sectors are working collaboratively, and this will accelerate cost reduction”, said Associate Professor Liu.

The workshop also highlighted the positive outcomes of the transition to a low emissions economy, and the opportunities carbon capture, storage and utilisation technologies present for the South East Asian region.

“The versatility of CCS to deliver deep emissions reductions across all sectors, as well as presenting an enormous opportunity for the creation of a new low emissions economy, is a great strength of the technology.

“This is of particular relevance for Singapore with the presence of an emissions intense petrochemical production industry”, said Dr Zhang.

Innovate4Climate is an annual event and in 2019 was hosted by the National Climate Change Secretariat (Singapore Government), the World Bank and the Ministry of Ecological Transition (Government of Spain), the event partner is IETA.

Currently, there are forty-three (43) large-scale CCS facilities – 18 commercially, five under construction and 20 in various stages of development. Australia’s first CCS facility, Gorgon, is due to come onstream this year.

Transition to a low emissions economy presents growth opportunity for Australia 
Transition to a low emissions economy presents growth opportunity for Australia 

31st May 2019

Brisbane Friday 31 May 2019: International leaders from industry, government, academia and the private sector have heard of the urgency of addressing rising emissions whilst learning of the opportunities the transition to a low emissions economy presents.

Speaking at the APAC CCS Forum, Brad Page CEO of event organiser the Global CCS Institute, told more than 100 delegates that addressing climate change is urgent, necessary and will require all technologies – including CCS – to be deployed at scale and at a much faster rate than is currently happening.

“Multiple independent and credible bodies have concluded that to achieve global climate change targets in the time frame required, all technologies are needed, and that CCS is the only likely solution for hard to decarbonise industries such as steel, cement and fertiliser manufacturing.

Mr Page highlighted the positive outcomes of a low emissions transition, and the opportunities CCS presents Australia’s communities, regions and the economy as a whole.

“The versatility of CCS to deliver deep emissions reductions across the power, industrial and transportation sectors, as well as presenting an enormous opportunity for the creation of a new low emissions economy, is a great strength of the technology.

“CCS leads to economic growth, it sustains communities and creates vital new jobs for regional areas. It also has a major role to play in the just transition for workers currently employed in the energy and industrial sector and preventing the early retirement of productive assets.

“There is no doubt Australia’s energy transition will be disruptive. However, it can also be a growth story. With an enabling policy framework and increased investment, we will achieve deep emissions reductions while enriching and preserving jobs and communities; including in fossil fuel resource regions”, said Mr Page.

Speakers at the Forum included representatives from the Australian and Victorian governments, UniSuper, Japan Bank for International Cooperation, Santos, Kawasaki Heavy Industries, China Baowu Steel Group and the CO2CRC.

Currently, there are forty-three (43) large-scale CCS facilities – 18 commercially, five under construction and 20 in various stages of development. Australia’s first CCS facility, Gorgon, is due to come onstream this year.

Ends

Lucy Temple-Smith (Melbourne): +61 466 982 068 lucy.temple-smith@globalccsinstitute.com

New Report analyzes California Carbon Capture and Storage Protocol
New Report analyzes California Carbon Capture and Storage Protocol

24th May 2019

The Global CCS Institute has launched a report analyzing California’s recently passed Carbon Capture and Storage Protocol (the Protocol). The report provides a summary of the regulation for project developers as well as policymakers in other states and countries, given its global applicability. While comparing it to other relevant regulations – including the federal carbon capture tax credit also known as 45Q – the report seeks to raise awareness for the opportunities created through the Protocol and to help project developers and policymakers understand the incentive structure and requirements alongside the environmental safeguards.

The Protocol, which was passed as an amendment to California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS), incentivizes carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects that reduce the lifecycle emissions from bioethanol, hydrogen, and crude, provided the fuel is sold into the California market. The Protocol, in a pioneering move, also incentivizes direct air capture projects globally, provided they adhere to the regulation's standards. The Institute’s report comes on the heels of an announcement that Oxy Low Carbon Ventures and Carbon Engineering will begin engineering the world’s largest direct air capture plant which will also be designed to be eligible for both California’s CCS LCFS credits and US federal 45Q tax credits.

“The Global CCS Institute welcomes the amendment of the LCFS with a CCS Protocol. This relatively recent development demonstrates that governments are beginning to recognize that in light of ambitious climate goals, full decarbonization is close to impossible without large-scale deployment of carbon capture and storage,” said Guloren Turan, General Manager, Advocacy and Communications, at the Global CCS Institute.

The Institute’s report reviews the Protocol which was passed in September 2018 with broad support from a diverse set of stakeholders including environmental and climate advocates, as well as industry, and went into effect in January 2019. The LCFS aims to reduce the carbon intensity of the State’s transport fuel mix by 20 per cent by 2030, relative to 2010 levels.

"Fighting climate change to keep global temperatures from increasing beyond 1.5 degrees Celsius requires immediate and unprecedented action. California pioneered the first Low Carbon Fuel Standard in 2007. With a Protocol for carbon capture and storage now in place, California will continue to drive down its emissions, accelerate investments in breakthrough technology, and create opportunities for a new kind of climate entrepreneur. I look forward to working with my colleagues in Congress to spur innovation in clean energy development though carbon capture technology,” said Congressman Scott Peters (D-CA) about the regulation.

Currently trading at roughly $180 t/CO2, the LCFS provides one of the highest values on carbon globally. For US-based projects it can also be stacked with a CCS-specific federal tax credit known as 45Q, which will ramp up to $50 t/CO2 for geologic sequestration and $35 t/CO2 for CO2 stored via enhanced oil recovery, combining it to the highest CCS incentive globally.

“When California’s Carbon Capture and Storage Protocol took effect in January, it was a major step in ensuring that investment in CCS can be a viable tool in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the state’s transportation sector,” said Deepika Nagabhushan, Program Director, Decarbonized Fossil Energy with Clean Air Task Force, a major US ENGO involved with advocating technological, regulatory and legislative pathways for addressing global climate change.

“The Institute’s report will help guide businesses to capitalize on the incentives at both the federal and state levels in the near term in developing CCS projects that have the effect of reducing California’s transportation CO2 emissions,” said Ms. Nagabhushan.

The report provides a concise summary of the most important details of the regulation while also offering insight into the interaction of states and federal regulation. For example, it describes how to stack the credits, compares the LCFS and 45Q eligibility, and lays out the criteria projects need to fulfill to qualify for both incentives. It also details storage, MRV, and liability requirements offering a comprehensive yet accessible analysis of the regulation.

“The direct air capture provisions also highlight that climate change is a transnational problem warranting global solutions,” highlights Ms. Turan.

“California has set itself an ambitious and laudable goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2045. To achieve this goal, the state will first have to double down on the carbon solutions that it has already championed, such as efficiency, renewable energy and clean vehicles. But it must also without a doubt aggressively pursue a broader suite of technologies and tools to curb its carbon emissions, and even remove them from the atmosphere. The latest changes to the LCFS regulation enabling CCS to participate in the program represent a visionary move on the state’s part, and a landmark in the quest to deploy such technologies more widely,” says George Peridas, Director, Carbon Management Partnerships, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

 

Download the report here

UK Committee on Climate Change highlights crucial role for carbon capture and storage in achieving a net-zero target in the UK
UK Committee on Climate Change highlights crucial role for carbon capture and storage in achieving a net-zero target in the UK

2nd May 2019

The Global CCS Institute welcomes the UK Committee on Climate Change (CCC) report, which recommends that the UK commits to cutting its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to net-zero by 2050 and highlights the crucial role carbon capture and storage (CCS) needs to play to achieve this goal. The long-awaited CCC report says: “CCS is a necessity and not an option.”

The report recognises that reaching net-zero GHG emissions in the UK will require important contributions from CCS in industry, for hydrogen production, combined with bioenergy (e.g. for power generation) and in flexible fossil-fired power generation, with up to 75-175 MtCO₂ being captured and stored annually by 2050.

The CCC recommends that CO₂ infrastructure development should start as early as possible, with the first CCS cluster being operational by 2026 and four more following soon after, with at least one of these clusters producing substantial amounts of low-carbon hydrogen. As such, it identifies the development of relevant CO2 infrastructure as an important policy priority.

Welcoming the report, Guloren Turan, General-Manager Advocacy and Communications at the Global CCS Institute said:

“This report is very timely and we hope that it will be an important impetus to government, industry and other stakeholders to accelerate their efforts to deploy CCS facilities and develop CO2 transport and storage infrastructure. There are many promising CCS projects in the pipeline across the UK that can bring considerable value for communities and industry.”

There are currently 43 large-scale CCS facilities operating or under development around the world. In the UK, there are six CCS facilities in early development: Acorn CCS, Caledonia Clean Energy, HyNet North West, H21 North of England, Teesside Collective, and BECCS pilot plant at Drax Power Station. Several of these facilities also involve hydrogen production.

You can read the full report here.

UK BEIS Committee releases report following its inquiry on CCUS
UK BEIS Committee releases report following its inquiry on CCUS

26th April 2019

The UK Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) Committee has released its final report which presents its recommendations and findings following its Inquiry on carbon capture, usage and storage (CCUS).

The report highlights the importance and value of CCUS to the UK and its economy and urges the UK Government to consider the technology as an important tool for least-cost decarbonisation. The Committee highlighted that CCUS has the unique ability to significantly reduce industrial emissions, enable the production of clean hydrogen and help deliver the UK’s emission reduction targets. The report also recommends urgent and sustained action to help accelerate the deployment of CCUS in the UK by putting forward a series of recommendations to support forward-looking policy development on CCUS.

On the occasion of the launch of the report, the Institute’s General-Manager Advocacy, Guloren Turan said:

“We welcome the constructive recommendations of the BEIS Committee report on CCUS which we believe presents an opportunity to strengthen UK’s ambition towards CCUS both across government and industry to further support the deployment of the technology. We commend Minister Claire Perry’s leadership and commitment to deploying CCUS in the UK and her recognition of the huge opportunities it can bring for the country."

In its report, the BEIS Committee also highlights the early mover advantage to deploying CCUS and the role of government to de-risking investments and developing business models for capture, and transport and storage.

The report is the outcome of a public consultation and several public expert hearings held with industry, academia and civil society. The BEIS Committee - a cross-party group aimed at assessing the policy and administration of BEIS department - launched the CCUS inquiry in May 2018 to examine the UK Government’s ambition to deploy CCUS to meet its climate targets, as highlighted in the UK Government Clean Growth Strategy.  With this inquiry, the work of the BEIS Committee aimed to complement the work of the CCUS Cost Challenge Taskforce.

You can read the full report here.

The Institute also recently released a report “Policy priorities to accelerate large-scale deployment of CCS”.  Read the full report here.

New report highlights strategic policy priorities for accelerating carbon capture and storage deployment
New report highlights strategic policy priorities for accelerating carbon capture and storage deployment

2nd April 2019

The Global CCS Institute, an international think tank and a leading authority on carbon capture and storage (CCS), is launching today a report exploring how to stimulate investment in CCS. The new report identifies concrete policy actions to ensure CCS delivers on global climate targets.

The Institute’s report reviews the progress achieved until now, and identifies the policies and commercial conditions that enabled investment in the 18 large-scale CCS facilities currently in operation, and the additional five that are under construction. The report also identifies overarching barriers to CCS deployment including market and information failures, which recent projects had to overcome.

Based on an assessment of existing CCS projects, the Global CCS Institute found that several of these facilities have common features, most built with grant support and relying on revenue from enhanced oil recovery. Others, in particular those in the United States, relied on tax credits, or the regulation of carbon emissions, in the case of the Gorgon project in Australia.  The paper also highlights that the cost of CCS is closely linked to the number of CCS facilities in operation and that it will continue to fall as new projects come online due to economies of scale and learning by doing.

Despite some progress in the deployment of CCS, the current policy environment will not suffice to stimulate the scale-up of the technology to deliver the number of projects needed to meet the Paris targets.  The paper reveals a policy framework that will enable the scaling up of CCS deployment, one that must focus on de-risking investments, creating new business models around shared transport and storage networks and long-term storage liability management. To achieve this, governments will have an important role to play.

The report also found that debt financing will be an essential asset for future projects. To accelerate project development, banks will have to provide access to affordable debt financing to CCS project developers. The paper also examines the eventual progression from high cost debt financing to the mitigation of risks that will result in the reduction of the cost of debt for future CCS projects.

Finally, the report puts forward a set of key recommendations that will create an enabling policy environment to accelerate the deployment of CCS:

  • Establish a value on carbon to create a financial incentive for investing in CCS
  • For governments to play the critical role of enabling the development of shared transport and storage infrastructure by investing directly in infrastructure or by setting the regulatory framework within which networks can be developed cost effectively
  • Implement a legal and regulatory framework that clarifies storage operators’ liabilities
  • Provide capital support in the form of grants, accelerated depreciation, concessional loans, or other mechanisms to attract private capital to CCS investments in the early stages of deployment.
  • Identify and consider additional policy interventions designed to reduce specific risks perceived by financiers and equity investors in order to bring down the cost of capital and enhance the financial viability of future CCS investments.

A webinar will be held on April 4th to discuss the report findings. Two authors of the Institute’s report, Dominic Rassool, Senior Consultant Policy and Finance and Alex Townsend, Senior Consultant Economics both from the Global CCS Institute will present the findings. You can register to the webinar here.

 

You can download the full report here.

 

Antonios Papaspiropoulos (Melbourne) : +61 401 944 478 antonios.papaspiropoulos@globalccsinstitute.com

Annya Schneider (Brussels): +32 255 03972 annya.schneider@globalccsinstitute.com

Lucy Temple-Smith (Melbourne): +61 466 982 068 lucy.temple-smith@globalccsinstitute.com

Lee Beck (Washington DC): +1 202 677 9053 lee.beck@globalccsinstitute.com

About the Global CCS Institute:  The Global CCS Institute is an international think tank whose mission is to accelerate the deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS), a vital technology to tackle climate change and provide energy security. Working with and on behalf of our Members, we drive the adoption of CCS as quickly and cost effectively as possible by sharing expertise, building capacity and providing advice and support so that this this vital technology can play its part in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. For more information, visit www.globalccsinstitute.com

 

 

Major US climate change forum rallies behind CCS as a key technology to decarbonize the economy
Major US climate change forum rallies behind CCS as a key technology to decarbonize the economy

19th March 2019

Washington, DC, March 19, 2019: Leaders from government, industry and the public sector meeting in Washington, DC have been told that no decarbonization option should be taken off the table given the scale and urgency of climate change.

Speaking at the 8th Annual Forum on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) hosted by the Global CCS Institute, Brad Page, the organisation’s CEO, told the audience of more than 120 delegates that all clean energy technologies must be deployed immediately to meet Paris targets and transition to a new energy economy.

Mr. Page, who heads the international think tank, said the 45-year old technology is proven and backed by science and commercial application. In fact, there are currently 18 large-scale CCS facilities in operation globally. Mr. Page added that CCS must sit alongside renewables and other clean technologies as a mainstream decarbonization option.

“The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) recently released 1.5 °C Report has reaffirmed the essential role CCS has to play in decarbonization. “The reality is, all decarbonization options are needed and all available technologies must be deployed at scale to ensure an emissions-free future by mid-century.”

Mr. Page said CCS can deliver deep emissions cuts in the power, industrial, and transportation sectors.
“Furthermore, as organizations like the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers have attested, CCS can create significant economic opportunities for job creation, new industries and growth.”

“CCS opens up a new set of opportunities for decarbonizing the United States’ economy. Not only will it allow a just transition for workers currently employed in the energy sector but will also prevent the early retirement of productive assets. As such, large-scale CCS deployment, alongside renewable and clean energy and as part of an economy-wide decarbonization strategy, has the opportunity to boost the US to become the manufacturing heart of a zero-emissions future.”

Mr Page said the United States has now joined a growing number of countries which are creating the “policy confidence” necessary to scale-up the deployment of CCS.

“An enabling policy framework is fundamental for large-scale CCS deployment globally, and project developers and investors need the confidence generated through consistent government support.

“In the US, the tradable tax credit incentive known as 45Q which was passed last year has created a climate that is allowing CCS to flourish.

“The 45Q tax credit should be seen as the most progressive CCS-specific incentive globally. At $50 t/CO2 for CO2 stored in geologic storage and $35 t/CO2 for CO2 permanently stored via enhanced oil recovery (EOR), it has already seen new projects announcements. More are expected, especially once the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) clarifies the administrative processes that will apply.”

Mr Page also pointed to the state of California’s recently passed CCS protocol for its Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) as an enabler to CCS projects that will reduce emissions from transportation – the state’s largest source of greenhouse gas emissions.

Additionally, Direct Air Capture, a technology that removes CO2 out of the air, would also benefit from the receipt of credits in the LCFS market.

Speakers at the Forum included representatives from Toyota, Occidental Petroleum, Southern Company, Exelon, LafargeHolcim, the Clean Air Task Force, the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, and the Aspen Institute.

 

European Parliament adopts ambitious resolution on climate change
European Parliament adopts ambitious resolution on climate change

15th March 2019

The Global CCS Institute welcomes the European Parliament’s adoption of the resolution on Europe’s long-term emission reduction strategy. The joint resolution puts forward the European Parliament’s position on the vision proposed by the European Commission for a competitive and prosperous climate neutral Europe. The resolution will help set a clear direction of travel for Europe’s climate and energy policy.

The Institute is pleased that the European Parliament took a positive stance on carbon capture and storage (CCS) acknowledging its important role in decarbonizing the industrial and energy sectors and achieving global climate targets, as highlighted in the IPCC SR15.

In response to the vote, Guloren Turan, General Manager for Advocacy at the Global CCS Institute stated that: “ Today’s vote recognises that Europe is ready to step up and take ambitious action to tackle climate change. This resolution marks an important step forward in the Parliament’s recognition of the role of CCS in achieving Europe’s climate targets. In addition to its important role as a climate mitigation technology, CCS can also deliver significant value to European economies and support a just transition for all. The upcoming European Council meeting and the Sibiu Summit will also be key opportunities to emphasize the need to embrace all climate solutions, including CCS, in Europe’s climate strategy.”

The Institute believes that it will be critical for Europe and its Member States to embrace CCS alongside other climate mitigation actions and technologies to deliver its ambitious climate goals. CCS will be needed to reduce emissions in the scale and timeframe required to deliver net-zero by mid-century. Three out of the four pathways included in the IPCC SR15 include CCS as a necessary solution to reach the 1.5 target.

The Institute stresses that CCS is a proven technology that has the potential to deliver deep emission reductions in energy-intensive industries and the power sector. In light of the European Parliament's resolution, it is important to emphasise that different carbon removal and negative emissions technologies have different stages of technological maturity and are confronted with different scalability challenges.

In the case of CCS, this is a proven and safe technology that has been in commercial use for over 40 years. To date, more than 200 million tons of CO2 have been safely stored. There are currently 18 CCS large-scale projects in operation globally. In Europe, Norway hosts two large-scale CCS projects, Sleipner and Snøhvit.

To deliver Europe’s climate ambition, immediate climate mitigation action is needed and efforts to develop CCS and CO2 transport and storage infrastructure should be a priority to mitigate emissions.

You can read the text of the adopted resolution here.

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