Publications

Publications

Developing a pipeline infrastructure for CO2 capture and storage: Issues and challenges

1st February 2009

Topic(s): CO2 transport, CO2 hubs

The study forecasts that the amount of pipeline that will be needed to transport CO2 will be between 15,000 miles and 66,000 miles by 2030, depending on how much CO2 must be sequestered and the degree to which enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is involved. The upper end of the forecast range is of the same order of magnitude as the miles of existing U.S. crude oil pipelines and products pipelines. While there are no significant barriers to building the forecasted pipeline mileage, the major challenges to implementing CCS are in public policy and regulation. Because a CCS industry can evolve in several ways, public policy decisions must address key questions about industry structure, government support of early development, regulatory models, and operating rules. Such issues must be resolved before necessary investments in a CCS pipeline system can be made.

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Developing a pipeline infrastructure for CO2 capture and storage: Issues and challenges

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