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Publications, Reports & Research

Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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The role of CCS in meeting climate policy targets
The role of CCS in meeting climate policy targets

23rd October 2017

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) refers to a set of technologies that may offer the potential for large-scale removal of CO2 emissions from a range of processes – potentially including the generation of electricity and heat, industrial processes, and the production of hydrogen and synthetic fuels. CCS has both proponents and opponents. Like other emerging low carbon technologies, CCS is not without risks or uncertainties, and there are various challenges that would need to be overcome if it were to be widely deployed. Policy makers’ decisions as to whether to pursue CCS should be based on a judgement as to whether the risks and uncertainties associated with attempting to deploy CCS outweigh the risks of not having it available as part of a portfolio of mitigation options, in future years.

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Overview of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Demonstration Project Business Models: Risks and Enablers on the Two Sides of the Atlantic
Overview of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Demonstration Project Business Models: Risks and Enablers on the Two Sides of the Atlantic

13th September 2017

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

There are 15 large-scale CCS projects operating globally. Ten out of these fifteen projects, are located in North America [1]. The European Union's (EU) stated ambition was to have up to twelve operating CCS projects by 2015 [2], however this goal was not accomplished. The two projects currently operating storage in the European Economic Area, Sleipner and Snøhvit, are located in Norway. Because of this disparity in the number of projects operating in North America and in Europe – ten vs. two – we have analysed business models of major CCS projects in North America and in Europe, with an aim to identify risks and enablers in CCS project financing development on both continents. We find that successful CCS project development depends on multiple factors, such as (i) clarity of regulatory frameworks, (ii) efficiency of permitting processes, and (iii) early and sustained stakeholder engagement for public acceptance. However, project finance remain the most challenging piece.

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Carbon capture and storage readiness index: comparative review of global progress towards wide-scale deployment
Carbon capture and storage readiness index: comparative review of global progress towards wide-scale deployment

21st August 2017

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is critical for meeting international climate change targets and deployment must therefore be both rapid and global. To date, deployment has been limited to only a few countries with several factors slowing progress. These factors can be quantified to track a country’s development and to identify enabling opportunities for wide-scale commercial deployment of CCS. This paper outlines the results of the Global CCS Institute’s CCS Readiness Index. The CCS Index quantifies these factors through a set of criteria across four indicators — inherent interest, policy, legal and regulatory, and storage — which are major barriers or accelerators to the deployment of CCS and compares results for over 30 countries. The methodology behind all three indicators is similar, with each indicator employing its own set of criteria to assess conditions within a country at a particular point in time. Countries are then scored against the criteria with the premise being that the highest scoring jurisdictions have the best opportunity for the deployment of a CCS project. The CCS Index demonstrates that countries with clear, long-term policy commitments to use CCS technologies as an emissions reduction method rank highly. Despite strong development trends in some regions of the world, the majority of countries cluster around the midpoint of the analysis, suggesting some progress towards enabling CCS development, but not yet enough to encourage wide-scale deployment. 

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Current status of global storage resources
Current status of global storage resources

21st August 2017

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

The successful deployment of carbon capture and storage as a means to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions requires the availability of significant geological storage capacity. Assessments that identify suitable sedimentary basins and their capacity are the first logical step in defining global carbon capture and storage potential. This paper presents a collation and summary of the current status of storage assessments worldwide known as the Global Storage Portfolio. The analysis found that there are substantial storage resources available in most regions of the world. Almost all nations that have published regional assessments have identified sufficient storage resources to support multiple carbon capture and storage projects. This analysis also found that the methods to determine and classify resources are highly variable across regions despite reliable assessment methodologies being available. Case studies on Europe and Southeast Asia discuss the different approaches being undertaken for their respective regional assessments and their progression towards being ready for the deployment of CCS.

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Global Costs of Carbon Capture and Storage
Global Costs of Carbon Capture and Storage

4th July 2017

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

This summary report presents data commissioned by the Global CCS Institute from Advisian (the consulting and advisory arm of WorleyParsons, a global engineering firm) of the current and likely future costs of CCS in power generation and industrial applications. The report provides cost estimates for CCS in seven industries, including power generation, iron and steel, cement and bio-ethanol production. Estimates are also provided for fourteen countries, including China, Germany, Canada, Indonesia, Morocco and South Korea.

The Institute commissioned this dataset to provide an independent and up-to-date reference for various stakeholders wishing to understand the cost and performance of facilities fitted with CCS technologies, including transport and storage. Standardised designs for each facility have been used and costs for these are transposed from the reference location to different countries, reflecting drivers such as local ambient conditions, labour rates and fuel cost and quality. The resulting cost estimates therefore involve a degree of uncertainty that is typical for studies of this type, but provide a sound representation of the likely cost of CCS using today’s commercially available technologies, as well as cost reductions possible from learning-by-doing and by using better technologies that are currently in various stages of development.

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Institute submission to Australian Government review of climate policies
Institute submission to Australian Government review of climate policies

9th May 2017

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

On 5 May the Institute lodged a submission in response to the Australian Government’s discussion paper on its review of climate change policies. This review is being undertaken at a critical time in the Australian energy and climate policy space, and is a stocktake of the Australian Government’s actions towards achieving Australia’s 2030 emission reduction targets and commitments under the Paris Agreement. The Institute’s submission points out the recent progress on large scale CCS facilities around the world and the important role of CCS in meeting Australia’s long-term emission reduction targets in a range of sectors. Central to this is providing policy parity to CCS, which will ensure emission reduction targets are met at least cost and with the optimal mix of technologies. The submission also makes broader recommendations for the Government’s review including the need to set legislated long-term targets that are supported by interim carbon budgets, periodic reporting of progress against targets and better coordination of state, territory and federal government policy.

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全球碳捕集与封存现状:2016年报告摘要
全球碳捕集与封存现状:2016年报告摘要

23rd February 2017

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

2016年全球碳捕集与封存现状报告 着重介绍了一些2016年实现的重大里程碑式成果,和在2016年已经进入运行或者很快就要开始运行的重要项目。2016年全球碳捕集与封存现状报告 由5个独立的报告组成,包括一份可以对外公开的报告摘要和研究院会员专享的系列报告。

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世界のCCS の動向:2016サマリーレポート
世界のCCS の動向:2016サマリーレポート

2nd February 2017

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

本年度のサマリーレポートは、2016年にCCS主要プロジェクトにおいて達成された業績と2016年に操業を開始また操業開始間近の主要プロジェクトにフォーカスをしています。本レポートと同時に刊行された「世界のCCSの動向:2016」は、5章から成り、このサマリーリポートの内容を含むより詳細な情報が網羅されています。

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Global CCS Institute CCS readiness Index
Global CCS Institute CCS readiness Index

17th November 2016

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is critical for meeting international climate change targets, and therefore deployment must be both rapid and global. To date, deployment has been limited to only a few countries and industries, with several factors slowing further progress. 

The Global CCS Institute (Institute) has developed a ‘CCS Readiness Index’ (CCS Index) which quantifies these factors, based on assessment criteria across four indicators — inherent interest, policy, legal and regulatory (legal) and storage — which reflect major barriers or enablers for the deployment of CCS.

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The Global Status of CCS: 2016 Summary Report
The Global Status of CCS: 2016 Summary Report

15th November 2016

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

The Global Status of CCS: 2016 highlights a number of significant operational milestones reached in 2016 and key projects that have either entered operation in 2016, or are very close to commencing operation. The Global Status of CCS: 2016 is comprised of five unique publications including a Summary Report available to the public and a series of reports developed exclusively for Institute Members. 

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Proceedings from the 2016 CCS Costs Workshop
Proceedings from the 2016 CCS Costs Workshop

14th July 2016

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

The fourth meeting of the CCS Cost Workshop (also known as the Expert Group on CCS Costs) was held on March 23‐24, 2016 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts.This function is now designated as the CCS Cost Network under the auspices of the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas Programme.

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世界のCCSの動向「第3章CCS技術」
世界のCCSの動向「第3章CCS技術」

12th May 2016

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

Exclusive Member Access

“世界のCCSの動向「第3章CCS技術」”は、CO2回収コストの削減と、CO2貯留資源の評価を中心に、CCS技術チェーン(回収、輸送、貯留)について考察したものである。CO2回収、輸送、貯留についての研究・開発に関心のある人々にとって最も価値ある内容となっている。

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