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Publications, Reports & Research

Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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Independent Review into the Future Security of the National Electricity Market – Preliminary Report
Independent Review into the Future Security of the National Electricity Market – Preliminary Report

24th February 2017

Topic(s): Energy efficiency

In October 2016, in the wake of a major blackout in the state of South Australia, the Council of Australian Governments directed the country’s chief scientist, Dr Alan Finkel, to draft a blueprint for energy security in the National Electricity Market.

Consultation on this blueprint covers a broad range of issues facing the Australian electricity market, primarily centred around how to ensure the delivery of electricity that is clean, reliable and affordable. The review is taking place during a period of heightened political and community concern over electricity price increases, the exit of traditional coal generation, increasing penetration of intermittent forms of renewable power, and high degrees of carbon and policy risk which are inhibiting investment in other much needed technologies. Recommendations arising from this review will factor into a broader review of Australia’s climate policy to take place over 2017.

The Institute provided its submission to this review of the electricity market on 21 February 2017. It contains analysis demonstrating that CCS is necessary among a full suite of options in achieving a low emissions power grid at least cost, that it can complement intermittent sources of renewable power, and it is cost competitive with the full range of generation and energy storage options being considered. 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Energy efficiency technologies: overview report
Energy efficiency technologies: overview report

1st March 2014

Topic(s): Energy efficiency

This report summarises the outcomes of a pilot project launched by the World Energy Council Knowledge Network on Energy Efficient Technologies in 2011. This work, focused on technologies, complements the well-established World Energy Council work on Energy Efficiency Policies, and more recent study projects addressing Energy Trilemma and Scenarios.

Energy efficient technologies can be found in all parts of the energy conversion chain: from exploration and production of primary energy resources, to power generation and oil refineries to electricity grids, to the final use in industry, buildings and transportation. But it is not only the technical potential which is crucial for successful introduction of energy efficient technologies. To assess the full potential of such technologies and identify the path towards their successful market introduction, it is necessary to consider their economic, realisable and also realistic potential.

Annexes

  • Annex I: energy efficiency potentials and barriers for realization in the industry sector
  • Annex II: energy efficient solutions for existing communities
  • Annex III: energy efficient solutions for thermal power solutions

 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

2014 getting to zero status update: a look at the projects, policies and programs driving zero net energy performance in commercial buildings
2014 getting to zero status update: a look at the projects, policies and programs driving zero net energy performance in commercial buildings

1st January 2014

Topic(s): Energy efficiency

This 2014 Getting to Zero Status Update presents the findings on Zero net energy (ZNE) buildings and ultra-low energy buildings and districts across North America and builds on the Getting to Zero 2012 Status Update work by New Buildings Institute (NBI). The 2014 Getting to Zero Status Update is based on extensive research by NBI as well as input from many of the key organizations, states and design firms that are leading the ZNE market.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Metal foam heat exchanger for dry cooling
Metal foam heat exchanger for dry cooling

1st November 2013

Topic(s): Energy efficiency

Metal foams fall at final hurdle. The use of metal foams to enhance heat exchange and dry cooling for power generation application did not deliver to its performance expectations. Although foams showed a 75% improvement in heat transfer over conventional systems used for air cooling, this comes at a cost of very much increased pressure drop. It was found that even at quite low air flows, the pressure drop is several times higher. Since parasitic power consumption (to provide the cooling air flow) is a significant consideration for air large cooled heat exchangers, this trade-off is so unfavourable to metal foam systems that they become unsuitable for these applications. As a result of this project was terminated at the appropriate stage-gate.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

2013 world energy issues monitor
2013 world energy issues monitor

1st February 2013

Topic(s): Energy efficiency

This is the 2013 edition of the World Energy Council’s annual assessment of the energy issues affecting the global energy sector.

This publication reports on improvements in energy efficiency and the rising global energy appetite.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Combined heat and power: a clean energy solution
Combined heat and power: a clean energy solution

1st August 2012

Topic(s): Energy efficiency

Combined heat and power (CHP) is an efficient and clean approach to generating electric power and useful thermal energy from a single fuel source. Instead of purchasing electricity from the distribution grid and burning fuel in an on-site furnace or boiler to produce thermal energy, an industrial or commercial facility can use CHP to provide both energy services in one energy-efficient step.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Strategic research priorities for cross-cutting technology
Strategic research priorities for cross-cutting technology

1st April 2012

Topic(s): Energy efficiency

‘Cross-cutting technology’ is the term used by the RHC-Platform to describe any energy technology or infrastructure which can be used either to enhance the thermal energy output of a renewable energy source (RES), or to enable a greater fraction of the output by the system to be used, or to allow the exploitation of RES which would be difficult or impossible to use in building-specific applications. This publication outlines the strategic research agenda for these technologies: district heating and cooling, thermal energy storage, heat pumps, and hybrid systems. 

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

ICT solutions for energy efficiency
ICT solutions for energy efficiency

1st January 2012

Topic(s): Energy efficiency

The purpose of this report is to explore the transformative role Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) can play in acting now, together and differently. ICT has played a significant role in the last decades of improving economic productivity. It now has the opportunity to enable further significant productivity improvements, and to help transform the world to a more sustainable, lower carbon and more resource-efficient future.

The bulk of the report provides case studies of actual examples of ICT solutions already developed and in action to enable energy efficiency in three particular areas – namely, smart logistics, smart grid/smart metering, and smart buildings.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

The importance of flexible electricity supply
The importance of flexible electricity supply

1st May 2011

Topic(s): Energy efficiency

Electricity demand is constantly changing, making variability and uncertainty inherent characteristics of electric systems. Control mechanisms have been developed to manage variability and uncertainty and maintain reliable operation. To understand the need for flexibility in the generation fleet, it is useful to examine the different grid operating timeframes, which can be divided into regulation, load following, and unit commitment.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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