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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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Global storage portfolio: a global assessment of the geological CO2 storage resource potential
Global storage portfolio: a global assessment of the geological CO2 storage resource potential

1st March 2016

Topic(s): Carbon capture, CO2 storage, Engineering and project delivery, Use and storage (CCUS)

The primary purpose of the Institute’s Global Storage Portfolio is to collate and summarise published regional assessments of key nations. The Portfolio also summarises key data on a nation’s readiness to host a commercial, large-scale project. For this reason, only proven storage scenarios including deep saline formations (DSF), depleted/depleting oil and gas fields (DGOF) and enhanced oil recovery using CO2 (CO2-EOR) are considered. The analysis has found that:

  • Substantial storage resources are present in most key regions of the world.
  • Reliable methodologies to determine and classify regional storage resources are available and have been widely applied, although there is no formally recognised international standard.
  • The level of resource assessment undertaken and the availability of characterisation data is highly variable across regions.
  • The level of detail a regional resource assessment has progressed as well as the policy, legal and regulatory frameworks are key criteria that can be used to gauge the readiness of any given nation to deploy a CCS project.

The storage resources are grouped into five regions:

  1. Asia-Pacific (fourteen countries)
  2. Americas (five countries)
  3. Middle East (three countries)
  4. Europe and Russia (EU plus three countries)
  5. Africa (four countries).

​The resulting portfolio will enable the reader to rapidly establish a snapshot of a country’s storage resource and potential to deploy a large-scale project.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Valuation of potential risks arising from a model, commercial-scale CCS project site
Valuation of potential risks arising from a model, commercial-scale CCS project site

1st June 2012

Topic(s): Carbon capture, Engineering and project delivery, Health, safety and environment, Use and storage (CCUS)

A diverse group of organisations from industry, government, and the environmental community jointly sponsored Industrial Economics (IEc), an expert in environmental economics and natural resource damage assessment, to develop and test a model approach for valuing the economic damages arising from a well-sited and well-managed CCS project. These damages included environmental and human health impacts arising from a range of potential events such as pipeline ruptures and subsurface leakage. They do not address potential impacts from facility construction or routine operation, nor do they address potential impacts to workers, business interruption, facility repair or similar ‘private’ costs internal to the operator. The model was successfully developed and applied to a ‘realistic’ project based on the publicly available risk assessment for a site from the FutureGen 1.0 site selection process. The project was planned to inject 50 million metric tons of CO2 over 50 years and to have a 50 year post-injection period (for a 100-year analysis period).

This site-specific application of the model showed that the ‘most likely’ (50th percentile) estimated damages arising from CO2 totalled approximately $7.3 million and ‘upper end’ (95th percentile) estimated damages totalled approximately $16.9 million. On a per metric ton basis, these results translate into ‘most likely’ (50th percentile) estimated damages of $0.15 per metric ton and ‘upper end’ (95th percentile) estimated damages of $0.34 per metric ton. When combined, the estimated damages for CO2 and H2S were roughly 10-15 per cent higher.

It is important to note that the range of damage estimates is highly sensitive to site-specific data. The sponsor group concludes that the tools exist to estimate prospective financial damages. Further, the sponsor group has developed insight into the magnitude and timing of dollar amounts that are likely to be at risk and the conditions under which they may be at risk at a well-selected and well-managed CCS project. This analytic approach is based on generally accepted practices within the financial and insurance industries, and can be applied, with adjustment for location, to CCS projects around the world.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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