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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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CO2 capture in the cement industry
CO2 capture in the cement industry

21st July 2008

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

The cement industry is one of the world’s largest industrial sources of CO2 emissions, accounting for 1.8 Gt/y in 2005, i.e. more than 6% of global emissions from the use of fossil fuels. Over the years the cement industry has substantially reduced emissions of CO2 per tonne of cement by improved energy efficiency, replacing fossil fuels with wastes which can sometimes be regarded as ‘carbon neutral’ and by increasing the use of additives in the cement product. The scope for further reductions by these means is becoming limited but there is an increasing need to reduce CO2 emissions to avoid climate change. CO2 capture and storage (CCS) presents one of the few opportunities to make further major reductions in emissions and the industry is currently considering the feasibility of applying this technique in order to plan for the future. In many ways the cement industry represents a good opportunity for CCS, because cement plants are relatively large point sources of CO2, the CO2 concentration in cement plant flue gas is relatively high (about 25mol%, dry basis) and over 60% of total CO2 emissions from a modern cement plant are from mineral decomposition and this CO2 cannot be avoided by use of alternative energy sources.

IEA GHG has undertaken a study to assess the technologies that could be used to capture CO2 in cement plants and their performances and costs. The study was undertaken for IEA GHG by Mott MacDonald. The British Cement Association collaborated and helped to obtain input from the cement manufacture and plant supply industries.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Carbon dioxide capture from existing coal-fired power plants
Carbon dioxide capture from existing coal-fired power plants

1st November 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

This study was performed to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of various levels of CO2 capture (e.g., 90%, 70%, 50%, and 30%) for retrofitting an existing pulverized coal-fired power plant (Conesville #5 unit in Ohio, United States) using advanced amine-based capture technology.  

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Capturing CO2
Capturing CO2

11th May 2007

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 capture

Emissions of greenhouse gases are expected to cause climate change. The main greenhouse gas is carbon dioxide (CO2) and the major source of it is the combustion of fossil fuels to supply energy. Emissions can be reduced by a variety of measures, such as improving energy efficiency and developing alternative energy sources, like wind and solar power. However, a rapid move away from fossil fuels is unlikely as energy supply infrastructure has a long lifetime, and such a move could destabilise economies. 

Another way to reduce emissions is to capture the CO2 that is released from fossil fuel-fired power plants and store it underground. This is the focus of this report, as power generation accounts for about one-third of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel use. The current leading technologies for power generation are pulverised fuel (PF) combustion steam cycles and natural gas combined cycles (NGCC). The IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEA GHG) has assessed the performance and costs of these power plants, both with and without the capture of CO2. Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) for the gasification of coal, which was included in the assessment, may be a suitable technology from which to capture CO2. A number of criteria were specified for all the studies to enable the results to be compared in a meaningful manner. The main specifications are listed in the Annex at the end of the report.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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