Filter by

Date +
Topic +
Organisation +

[ Clear Filtering ]

Publications, Reports & Research

Resources

Publications, Reports & Research

Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

View our Publications, Reports & Research Library Disclaimer.

Filter by

[ Clear Filtering ]

What have we learned from IEA GHG storage activities
What have we learned from IEA GHG storage activities

1st February 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

This report is intended to provide a summary of key learning points from recent IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEA GHG) activities related to the geological storage of CO2.

The report summarises key learning points from IEA GHG operating Phase 5, which commenced in 2005 and effectively coincided with the publication of the IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (IPCC SRCCS). That publication provides a useful reference point for the subsequent knowledge on storage acquired through IEA GHG activities.

Download


Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Aquifer storage: development issues
Aquifer storage: development issues

1st November 2008

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

Earlier studies by IEA GHG had shown that of the main geological storage reservoirs available globally for CO2 storage, deep saline aquifers have the highest storage potential and substantial cuts in CO2 emissions may therefore require utilisation of deep saline aquifers as storage reservoirs. However, the storage capacity of deep saline aquifers from various estimates show wide bounds: from 1,000 to over 10,000 GtCO2 globally. Many of the deep saline aquifers being considered for storage are ‘virgin’ formations and structures in which little or no geological characterisation has taken place, in contrast to many oil and gas fields. Therefore, considerable exploratory work will be required before such structures can be considered as “fit for purpose” for CO2 storage. Selection of safe and secure geological reservoirs must be accompanied by confidence in the associated CO2 storage capacities.

The aim of this study was to bring together and review the research that has been undertaken in Europe, North America, Japan and Australia, to develop an understanding of how knowledge on deep saline aquifers has developed in recent years, in particular since the 2005 IPCC Special Report on CO2 Capture and Storage (IPCC SRCCS). Emphasis was placed on the identification of knowledge gaps and priority areas for R&D activities.

Download


Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

A regional assessment of the potential for CO2 storage in the Indian subcontinent
A regional assessment of the potential for CO2 storage in the Indian subcontinent

12th May 2008

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

The IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEA GHG) has recently commissioned the British Geological Society (BGS) to conduct a regional assessment of the Indian subcontinent in order to gauge the potential for CO2 storage in geological reservoirs in that region. This is the 3rd regional capacity study conducted by the IEA GHG following on from assessments of Europe and North America. It should be noted that the study only assessed the four main options of geological storage; deep saline aquifers, depleted oil and gas fields, and storage in deep unminable coal fields. In addition, the study has undertaken an assessment of the current large point source emissions from the power sector on the Indian subcontinent and assessed their geographical relationship with possible geological stores. This process is also known as sourcestore matching, and a good source of CO2 close to suitable geological storage reservoirs can significantly impact on the costs and technical feasibility of a CCS operation. Without nearby sources for injection, the transport element of the CO2 chain becomes more expensive, and thus can result in the classification of a proposal as uneconomical.

The choice of the Indian subcontinent for this third study is primarily down to two main reasons. Firstly, as an emergent economy, India is considered likely to experience high growth in energy demand due to increasing economic development, and this will naturally include a corresponding increase in anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Much of the increased power demand will come from increased use of fossil fuels and in particular coal. The growth in energy demand is likely to be met by government backed plans to install increased capacity in power plants throughout many regions. History has taught us that when a country undergoes rapid economic growth, there is a corresponding increase in the demand for power and subsequent increase in anthropogenic CO2 emissions. The second driver behind the choice the Indian subcontinent is the current lack of any other definitive study into the capacity for CCS in the area.

Download


Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Weyburn Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Project
Weyburn Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Project

1st April 2008

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

This National Energy Technology Laboratory Fact Sheet provides an overview of the Weyburn Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Project in Saskatchewan, Canada.

Download


Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Industrial carbon dioxide emissions and carbon dioxide storage potential in the UK
Industrial carbon dioxide emissions and carbon dioxide storage potential in the UK

1st October 2006

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), CO2 storage

This report, funded by United Kingdom Department of Trade and Industry, considers the UK’s emissions of carbon dioxide from large industrial point sources such as power stations and the potential geological storage capacity to safely and securely store these emissions.

Download


Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Newsletter

Get the latest CCS updates