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Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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Carbon dioxide capture and storage and the UNFCCC: Recommendations for addressing technical issues
Carbon dioxide capture and storage and the UNFCCC: Recommendations for addressing technical issues

1st November 2010

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

This policy brief, produced by the World Resources Institute (WRI), provides context, concise analysis, and recommendations to Parties for addressing carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) issues raised to date in the twin track United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and Kyoto Protocol (KP) processes.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Carbon, capture, transport and storage regulatory test exercise: 11 & 12 August 2010. Output report
Carbon, capture, transport and storage regulatory test exercise: 11 & 12 August 2010. Output report

12th August 2010

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

From April to August 2010, the Scottish Government coordinated a scenario project to assess the regulatory framework for carbon capture and storage (CCS) in Scotland.  The principal objective of the project was to identify any regulatory gaps or overlaps that could be streamlined or better managed, and to evaluate the risks, barriers, information gaps and any other issues that would affect the successful demonstration and deployment of CCS in Scotland.

The project comprised the following components:

  • An illustrative CCS project application to cover full chain, capture, transport, storage and decommissioning – based on a coal-fired plant, post-combustion capture, onshore pipeline transport, with storage in the North Sea;
  • Consideration of the project application in a live process exercise involving all of the major stakeholders in a two day workshop (developers, regulators[1], government, NGOs, public interest groups);
  • Cradle to grave assessment of the whole project for the full raft of 56 consents/licenses required.
  • External peer review assessment and critique of the process by observers from the Global CCS Institute and EU Zero Emissions Technology Platform (ZEP).

Key findings of the process:

  • Full chain CCS projects are some of the largest infrastructure projects ever considered in Scotland with some of the greatest amounts of public funding;
  • These are complex projects involving multiple interest groups and a range of overlapping regulatory regimes;
  • The regulatory framework for CCS is emerging well in the UK, with regulators taking a positive, enabling approach to CCS projects, whilst protecting the environment and human health;
  • Aspects of CCS regulation are still emerging, particularly offshore, where there is greatest uncertainty for developers, and regulators and developers will 'learn by doing';
  • Some remaining technological issues need to be addressed before regulators can be certain, but projects are underway to address these gaps;
  • Environment agencies could permit a good application now within the existing regulatory framework which is generally fit-for-purpose
  • Co-operation and joint working across Government departments and regulators will be essential to ensuring effective management of CCS regulation within the demanding timescales required by the UK and EU CCS competitions;
  • Regulators could also look at procedures to improve the way in which environmental information is made available as part of the licensing/consenting process; and at ways to better inform the public about the whole chain of a CCS project and the many consents and consultations associated with this.
  • Early discussions with stakeholders are key to streamlining the regulatory process in all parts of the CCS chain
  • Public awareness/engagement is the key issue that will determine the overall success of CCS projects.

Overall conclusions

From this, participants concluded that the CCS demonstration programmes planned at UK and EU level would be the primary vehicle for testing and refinement of the regulatory approach and for effective public engagement. Ensuring that this was a key feature of the demonstration projects was as important as them assessing the economic and technical viability of CCS and will be a key part of the knowledge exchange and learning to be made available in the demonstration programmes.

It is clear that all of the early enablers (developers, regulators, governments, NGOs, academics) have a big responsibility in ensuring the successful demonstration of CCS.  Much of the learning around CCS – on the regulatory aspects as well as on the technical and economic ones will come through engagement with the actual project applications coming forward under the demonstration programme.

Overall, given the complexity and size of the CCS projects and the large numbers of permits required, the process showed that effective management of the regulatory framework would be crucial to the success of the demonstration programme in the UK and EU.  There is general support amongst participants (developers, regulators, NGOs, government) for managing project applications collectively through some form of project monitoring board that can consider the collective time management of all of the permits in the round.


[1] Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Offshore, The Crown Estate, Marine Scotland, the Scottish Government Energy Consents Unit, the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA), the Health & Safety Executive (HSE) and Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH))

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

IEA/CSLF report to the Muskoka 2010 G8 Summit. Carbon capture and storage: progress and next steps
IEA/CSLF report to the Muskoka 2010 G8 Summit. Carbon capture and storage: progress and next steps

14th June 2010

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

Two years after the G8 leaders commitment to the broad deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) by 2020, significant progress has been made towards commercialisation of CCS technologies. Yet the 2008 Hokkaido G8 recommendation to launch 20 large-scale CCS demonstration projects by 2010 remains a challenge and will require that governments and industry accelerate the pace toward achieving this critical goal. This is one of the main findings of a new report by the International Energy Agency (IEA), the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF), and the Global CCS Institute, to be presented to G8 leaders at their June Summit in Muskoka, Canada.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Climate change, carbon sequestration, and property rights
Climate change, carbon sequestration, and property rights

23rd February 2010

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

This technology, known as carbon capture and sequestration (CCS), could provide deep emission cuts, particularly from coal power generation, on a worldwide basis. In order to widely deploy this technology, future CCS operators must be able to access millions of acres of deep subsurface “pore space” roughly a kilometer below the earth’s surface to sequester the CO2 for hundreds to thousands of years. This Article explores questions relat-ing to ownership of subsurface pore space, physical takings, regulato-ry takings, and just compensation that will necessarily accompany the implementation of CCS in the United States. In order to accommo-date the full range of property rights and takings issues that will arise with CCS, this Article proposes a regulatory framework based in part on the Natural Gas Act to address these issues in connection with subsurface CO2 sequestration.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

CCS ready policy: considerations and recommended practices for policymakers
CCS ready policy: considerations and recommended practices for policymakers

17th February 2010

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

This report provides guidance to policymakers on deciding whether a CCS Ready Policy is desirable and, if so, selecting different levels of requirements for capture, storage and transport based on jurisdictional characteristics and requirements.

They also provide detailed guidelines for policymakers in developing CCS Ready policy, and for regulators in implementing such a policy.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

CCS Ready 정책:  정책담당자를 위한 고려사항 및 추천안
CCS Ready 정책: 정책담당자를 위한 고려사항 및 추천안

17th February 2010

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

CCS Ready플랜트에 대한 명확한 정의는 정책 담당자들이 CCS Ready플랜트의 기본 요건을 개발하는 데 사용될 수 있다. 정책 담당자들을 돕기 위해 이 보고서 본문의 고려 사항 및 추천안에서 제안된 정의에는, CCS Ready 플랜트는 포집, 수송, 저장 각 단계에 대한 준비가 되어 있어야 한다는 개념이 반영되어 있다. 이 3 단계는 서로 밀접한 연관이 있으며, CCS의 성공적인 보급을 위해 반드시 필요하다. 
이러한 정의에 근거하여 고려 사항 및 추천안은 CCS Ready 플랜트의 기타 요소(예 : 공장 설계, 장비 사전 투자, 저장부지 선정, 저장부지와 수송 통로 상충 이용 및 권리)를 선별했다. 각 요소에 해당하는 CCS Ready 플랜트에 대한 특정 요구 조건이 세 가지 단계로 제시되어 있다. 
마지막으로, 고려 사항 및 추천안은 정책 담당자의 CCS Ready 정책이 바람직한 것인지 여부를 판단하고, 관할권의 특성과 요구 조건에 적합한 포집•저장•수송 준비 공장의 필요조건을 제시할 것이다. 또한 정책 담당자가 CCS Ready 정책을 개발하고, 입법 담당자가 해당 정책을 시행하는 과정에서 참고할 수 있는 상세한 지침을 제공한다.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Efficiency of policy choices for the deployment of large scale low carbon technologies: The case of carbon capture and sequestration
Efficiency of policy choices for the deployment of large scale low carbon technologies: The case of carbon capture and sequestration

1st January 2010

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

The focus of this report is on the specific barriers to learning investment during pre-commercial deployment of large scale and intertwined technologies. We first analyze the market failures inherent to the barriers to innovation that exist in the market, which justify support during the learning investment phase and the subsequent roll out of CCS capacity in electricity generation. Then we analyze and compare the efficiency of the different ways to help support CCS technologies to cross this so-called “death valley”: command and control instruments (CCS mandates, low carbon ratios on production), investment support under different designs (direct subsidy, tax credit, subsidy by trust fund) and production subsidies (guaranteed carbon price, feed-in price, amongst others). These instruments are compared and contrasted according to four criteria: effectiveness, static efficiency, dynamic efficiency and timing (adequacy to the technology development stage). We conclude that policy instruments must be adapted to the technological and commercial maturity of the CCS system at some point between the demonstration stage and the purely commercial deployment stage. In particular mandate policies must be handled with some care. With regards to subsidization mechanisms, their design must be market-oriented, this is particularly the case with auctioning, in order to limit information asymmetries between CCS investors and regulators.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Energy Bill research paper 09/88
Energy Bill research paper 09/88

3rd December 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

The Energy Bill 2009-10 is a Government Bill sponsored by the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC). It follows on from the UK low carbon transition plan,1 which aims to deliver emissions cuts of 34% from 1990 levels by 2020 and by 80% by 2050, while maintaining security of supply, maximising economic opportunities and protecting vulnerable consumers.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

International CCS policies and regulations: WP5.1a/WP5.4 report
International CCS policies and regulations: WP5.1a/WP5.4 report

25th October 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

Key challenges facing the large-scale deployment of CCS include technology, costs, financing, public acceptance and legal and regulatory issues. This report, authored by Naser Odeh and Heather Haydock for the Near Zero Emissions Coal project, is concerned with the regulatory and legal issues facing CCS deployment in China. The report reviews the status of CCS regulation worldwide covering the various stages of a CCS project life cycle including carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and CO2 transport in addition to the injection and post-injection phases.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Criteria for technical and economic assessment of plants with low CO2 emissions
Criteria for technical and economic assessment of plants with low CO2 emissions

1st May 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

The IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme (IEA GHG) undertakes studies to assess technologies for abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. IEA GHG has concentrated on CO2 capture and storage (CCS) applied to power generation but it has also assessed CCS in other industries and will compare the relative merits of CCS and alternative greenhouse gas abatement options. Soon after IEA GHG started operation in 1991 it produced a set of standard technical and economic criteria for assessment of power plants with capture to ensure that its studies are undertaken on a consistent basis, as far as possible. These criteria have continued to be used since then, with some minor modifications.

In the time since IEA GHG was set up, economic conditions have changed, knowledge of CCS and other technologies has increased and IEA GHG has been undertaking increasingly detailed studies. In response to these changes IEA GHG has decided to revise and expand its assessment criteria. As a starting point IEA GHG’s criteria for new power plants with CO2 capture have been updated and some general guidelines for assessment of other types of plant with CO2 capture have been included. These changes are described in this report. Future work will look to expand the criteria to encompass retrofit of CO2 capture, the full CCS chain including CO2 transport and storage and non-CCS energy technologies. In the mean time a notional cost of CO2 transport and storage shall be assumed and sensitivities to a range of costs shall be assessed.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: policies and legislation framing carbon capture and storage globally
Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: policies and legislation framing carbon capture and storage globally

31st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

In May 2009, a consortium led by WorleyParsons and comprising Schlumberger, Electric Power Research Institute and Baker & McKenzie was engaged to undertake the Strategic Analysis of the Global Status of Carbon Capture and Storage.

The consortium was tasked to undertake a comprehensive survey of the status of CCS and to develop a series of reports analysing CCS projects, the economics of CCS, policies supporting CCS development and existing research and development networks.  A fifth report - the Synthesis Report - was also developed and this summarises the findings of the first four reports, and provides a comprehensive assessment of the gaps and barriers to the deployment of large-scale CCS projects, including strategies and recommendations to address these issues.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies, international policy and legislation
Strategic analysis of the global status of carbon capture and storage. Report 3: country studies, international policy and legislation

31st March 2009

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS), Policy, law and regulation

In May 2009, a consortium led by WorleyParsons and comprising Schlumberger, Electric Power Research Institute and Baker & McKenzie was engaged to undertake the Strategic Analysis of the Global Status of Carbon Capture and Storage.

The consortium was tasked to undertake a comprehensive survey of the status of CCS and to develop a series of reports analysing CCS projects, the economics of CCS, policies supporting CCS development and existing research and development networks.  A fifth report - the Synthesis Report - was also developed and this summarises the findings of the first four reports, and provides a comprehensive assessment of the gaps and barriers to the deployment of large-scale CCS projects, including strategies and recommendations to address these issues.

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Disclaimer

The content within the Global CCS Institute Publications, Reports and Research Library is provided for information purposes only. We make every effort and take reasonable care to keep the content of this section up-to-date and error-free. However, we make no claim as to its accuracy, currency or reliability.

Content and material featured within this section of our website includes reports and research published by third parties. The content and material may include opinions and recommendations of third parties that do not reflect those held by the Global CCS Institute.

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