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Publications, Reports & Research

Our publications, reports and research library hosts over 500 specialist reports and research papers on all topics associated with CCS.

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Principles for Best Practice Geomechanics for CCS Injection Operations and its Application to the CarbonNet Project
Principles for Best Practice Geomechanics for CCS Injection Operations and its Application to the CarbonNet Project

27th October 2017

CarbonNet is investigating the potential for establishing a commercial scale CCS network, bringing together multiple CO2 capture projects in Victoria’s Latrobe Valley, transporting the CO2 via pipeline and injecting it deep into nearshore underground storage sites in the Gippsland region. It plans an initial capacity to capture, transport and store in the range of 1-5 Mtpa of CO2 during the 2020s.

The latest report, titled  “Principles for Best Practice Geomechanics for CCS Injection Operations and its Application to the CarbonNet Project”, found the basin in which the CarbonNet Project site is targeting has the ideal geological conditions for storage. A CarbonNet Project study shows that their storage site would not be prone to seismicity and that the selected site is suitable for the permanent storage of CO2.

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Report led by researchers from University College London: "The role of CCS in meeting climate policy targets"
Report led by researchers from University College London: "The role of CCS in meeting climate policy targets"

24th October 2017

The Global CCS Institute has commissioned an authoritative and independent report that examines policy issues in the deployment of CCS, in accordance with global commitments to limit temperature increases to below 2 and 1.5 degrees Celsius. It outlines comprehensively the arguments made for and against CCS deployment, examines the experience of CCS deployment to date in a range of countries, draws lessons from other analogous technologies, and explores findings from integrated energy systems modelling.

The report is intended to inform a wide variety of stakeholders on the relative importance of the full set of policy instruments available to promote CCS and emission reduction technologies more generally.

The report was led by authors Dr Nick Hughes and Professor Paul Ekins at the UCL Institute for Sustainable Resources, as part of a consortium that drew in other world-leading expertise from the UCL Energy Institute, UCL Faculty of Laws, University of Edinburgh and the UK Energy Research Centre. The project team brought together extensive experience on CCS technology, legal and regulatory issues connected to CCS, low-carbon energy policy-making, energy systems analysis and the governance of energy technologies.

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The role of CCS in meeting climate policy targets
The role of CCS in meeting climate policy targets

23rd October 2017

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) refers to a set of technologies that may offer the potential for large-scale removal of CO2 emissions from a range of processes – potentially including the generation of electricity and heat, industrial processes, and the production of hydrogen and synthetic fuels. CCS has both proponents and opponents. Like other emerging low carbon technologies, CCS is not without risks or uncertainties, and there are various challenges that would need to be overcome if it were to be widely deployed. Policy makers’ decisions as to whether to pursue CCS should be based on a judgement as to whether the risks and uncertainties associated with attempting to deploy CCS outweigh the risks of not having it available as part of a portfolio of mitigation options, in future years.

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The role of CCS in meeting climate policy targets
The role of CCS in meeting climate policy targets

23rd October 2017

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) refers to a set of technologies that may offer the potential for large-scale removal of CO2 emissions from a range of processes – potentially including the generation of electricity and heat, industrial processes, and the production of hydrogen and synthetic fuels. CCS has both proponents and opponents. Like other emerging low carbon technologies, CCS is not without risks or uncertainties, and there are various challenges that would need to be overcome if it were to be widely deployed. Policy makers’ decisions as to whether to pursue CCS should be based on a judgement as to whether the risks and uncertainties associated with attempting to deploy CCS outweigh the risks of not having it available as part of a portfolio of mitigation options, in future years.

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Overview of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Demonstration Project Business Models: Risks and Enablers on the Two Sides of the Atlantic
Overview of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Demonstration Project Business Models: Risks and Enablers on the Two Sides of the Atlantic

13th September 2017

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

There are 15 large-scale CCS projects operating globally. Ten out of these fifteen projects, are located in North America [1]. The European Union's (EU) stated ambition was to have up to twelve operating CCS projects by 2015 [2], however this goal was not accomplished. The two projects currently operating storage in the European Economic Area, Sleipner and Snøhvit, are located in Norway. Because of this disparity in the number of projects operating in North America and in Europe – ten vs. two – we have analysed business models of major CCS projects in North America and in Europe, with an aim to identify risks and enablers in CCS project financing development on both continents. We find that successful CCS project development depends on multiple factors, such as (i) clarity of regulatory frameworks, (ii) efficiency of permitting processes, and (iii) early and sustained stakeholder engagement for public acceptance. However, project finance remain the most challenging piece.

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Current status of global storage resources
Current status of global storage resources

21st August 2017

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

The successful deployment of carbon capture and storage as a means to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions requires the availability of significant geological storage capacity. Assessments that identify suitable sedimentary basins and their capacity are the first logical step in defining global carbon capture and storage potential. This paper presents a collation and summary of the current status of storage assessments worldwide known as the Global Storage Portfolio. The analysis found that there are substantial storage resources available in most regions of the world. Almost all nations that have published regional assessments have identified sufficient storage resources to support multiple carbon capture and storage projects. This analysis also found that the methods to determine and classify resources are highly variable across regions despite reliable assessment methodologies being available. Case studies on Europe and Southeast Asia discuss the different approaches being undertaken for their respective regional assessments and their progression towards being ready for the deployment of CCS.

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Carbon capture and storage readiness index: comparative review of global progress towards wide-scale deployment
Carbon capture and storage readiness index: comparative review of global progress towards wide-scale deployment

21st August 2017

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is critical for meeting international climate change targets and deployment must therefore be both rapid and global. To date, deployment has been limited to only a few countries with several factors slowing progress. These factors can be quantified to track a country’s development and to identify enabling opportunities for wide-scale commercial deployment of CCS. This paper outlines the results of the Global CCS Institute’s CCS Readiness Index. The CCS Index quantifies these factors through a set of criteria across four indicators — inherent interest, policy, legal and regulatory, and storage — which are major barriers or accelerators to the deployment of CCS and compares results for over 30 countries. The methodology behind all three indicators is similar, with each indicator employing its own set of criteria to assess conditions within a country at a particular point in time. Countries are then scored against the criteria with the premise being that the highest scoring jurisdictions have the best opportunity for the deployment of a CCS project. The CCS Index demonstrates that countries with clear, long-term policy commitments to use CCS technologies as an emissions reduction method rank highly. Despite strong development trends in some regions of the world, the majority of countries cluster around the midpoint of the analysis, suggesting some progress towards enabling CCS development, but not yet enough to encourage wide-scale deployment. 

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Modelling for the Finkel Review – Implications for CCS in the Australian Power Sector
Modelling for the Finkel Review – Implications for CCS in the Australian Power Sector

19th July 2017

The emissions reduction trajectory used in the Finkel Review modelling, by accommodating the Australian Government’s current 2030 target, is not consistent with a 2 or 1.5 degree outcome on which the business case for large scale CCS deployment heavily depends. This is the key element of the modelling that resulted in CCS (and other technologies) not being deployed. This Institute member  briefing examines this and other modelling aspects in more detail, including 2 degree compliant scenarios examined earlier by the Climate Change Authority and by CSIRO. 

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Global Costs of Carbon Capture and Storage
Global Costs of Carbon Capture and Storage

4th July 2017

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

This summary report presents data commissioned by the Global CCS Institute from Advisian (the consulting and advisory arm of WorleyParsons, a global engineering firm) of the current and likely future costs of CCS in power generation and industrial applications. The report provides cost estimates for CCS in seven industries, including power generation, iron and steel, cement and bio-ethanol production. Estimates are also provided for fourteen countries, including China, Germany, Canada, Indonesia, Morocco and South Korea.

The Institute commissioned this dataset to provide an independent and up-to-date reference for various stakeholders wishing to understand the cost and performance of facilities fitted with CCS technologies, including transport and storage. Standardised designs for each facility have been used and costs for these are transposed from the reference location to different countries, reflecting drivers such as local ambient conditions, labour rates and fuel cost and quality. The resulting cost estimates therefore involve a degree of uncertainty that is typical for studies of this type, but provide a sound representation of the likely cost of CCS using today’s commercially available technologies, as well as cost reductions possible from learning-by-doing and by using better technologies that are currently in various stages of development.

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The opportunities to promote carbon capture and storage (CCS) in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)
The opportunities to promote carbon capture and storage (CCS) in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)

7th June 2017

The effective implementation of the Paris Agreement under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) will strongly rely on its leverage of existing institutional arrangements under both the Convention and the Kyoto Protocol, as well as the complementarity of any future arrangements. This staff paper identifies, characterises and analyses how the UNFCCC’s formal communication channels (referred to as ‘vehicles’ in the paper) used to articulate national climate action pledges and response strategies can assist the further development and deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies. 

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Institute submission to Australian Government review of climate policies
Institute submission to Australian Government review of climate policies

9th May 2017

Topic(s): Carbon capture, use and storage (CCUS)

On 5 May the Institute lodged a submission in response to the Australian Government’s discussion paper on its review of climate change policies. This review is being undertaken at a critical time in the Australian energy and climate policy space, and is a stocktake of the Australian Government’s actions towards achieving Australia’s 2030 emission reduction targets and commitments under the Paris Agreement. The Institute’s submission points out the recent progress on large scale CCS facilities around the world and the important role of CCS in meeting Australia’s long-term emission reduction targets in a range of sectors. Central to this is providing policy parity to CCS, which will ensure emission reduction targets are met at least cost and with the optimal mix of technologies. The submission also makes broader recommendations for the Government’s review including the need to set legislated long-term targets that are supported by interim carbon budgets, periodic reporting of progress against targets and better coordination of state, territory and federal government policy.

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Monitoring Technology for CO2 Geological Sequestration in Ultra-Low Permeability Reservoir of Yanchang Petroleum
Monitoring Technology for CO2 Geological Sequestration in Ultra-Low Permeability Reservoir of Yanchang Petroleum

29th March 2017

Topic(s): CO2 storage

To promote the development of CCS in China, the Global CCS Institute and China National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) held a joint carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS) workshop in Yan’An China in July 2013. Out of this collaboration the Global CCS Institute has commissioned Yanchang Petroleum Group to produce four knowledge-sharing reports on its integrated CCS project.

The third report of the series discusses the monitoring and verification technologies and techniques of Yanchang Petroleum CCUS Project. It highlights project achievements, lessons learned and the future monitoring workplan.

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